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37 results found for Forestry
Freshly cut Christmas trees lined up for purchase at the Lowe's Home Improvement store in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Christmas Trees
Before buying a pre-cut Christmas tree, put it through a few freshness tests, says University of Georgia Extension Agent Adam Speir. Christmas trees can be kept healthy and green through the holidays by following these tips.
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Farmgate Value Report
Led by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013.
Conks, fibrous but sometimes fleshy fruiting bodies of a wood-rotting fungus, grow on a tree CAES News
Tree Decay
Wood-rotting organisms can slowly nibble away at tree trunks and buttress roots. Many trees that topple look perfectly healthy before they fall. Afterward, it becomes clear that there were absolutely no structural roots remaining for support.
Fall is the perfect time to install new trees or shrubs or to move existing ones to new locations. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts recommend digging the planting hole two to three times the diameter of the soil ball. CAES News
Tree Planting
The transition of leaf color symbolizes an end to the growing season, but it is the best time of year to start trees in our landscape. When correctly sited and planted, a fall-planted tree will perform better than a spring-planted tree because the fall tree will establish roots before the warm summer temperatures draw moisture from and cause stress to the tree.
CAES News
Forestry Field Day
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the UGA Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources are teaming up to host a Southeast Georgia Forestry Field Day and Workshop. Georgia landowners, timber managers and forestry industry personnel are encouraged to attend the free event.
University of Georgia agricultural specialist Robbie Beck clears a plot of land on the UGA Westbrook Farm in preparation for the Sept. 17 Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day. CAES News
Agroforestry & Wildlife Field Day
Controlling coyotes and clearing trees will top the list of popular topics at the Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day on Thursday, Sept. 17, at the University of Georgia’s Westbrook Research Farm in Griffin, Georgia.
A deer dines on pasture grass in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Forestry Field Day
Landowners can learn how to care for their land at the 2015 Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day. The tri-annual educational event is set for Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia.
University of Georgia researchers are surveying landowners in Georgia to quantify the economic damage feral swine are causing the state. CAES News
Feral Hogs
University of Georgia researchers are surveying landowners in Georgia to quantify the economic damage feral swine are causing the state.
A redbud tree (cercis spp.) blooms during springtime on the UGA Griffin Campus CAES News
Tree care class
Tree care, from diseases to selection, will be the focus of an upcoming University of Georgia symposium set for Aug. 21 at the DeKalb County Extension office in Decatur.
Co-authored by Thomas Foken, Monique Leclerc's book, Footprints in Micrometeorology and Ecology, is the first textbook on the subject and covers how to interpret meteorological measurements made at a given level over a surface with regard to characteristic properties such as roughness, albedo, heat, moisture, carbon dioxide and other gases. CAES News
Micrometeorology Textbook
Some landscapes — like forests — are known for keeping carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Others shed carbon dioxide or other gasses that can affect the environment. Calculating just how much of each gas is held or released can be difficult but University of Georgia scientist Monique Leclerc has literally written the book on the subject.