Browse Climate Stories - Page 3

141 results found for Climate
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes. CAES News
Prevent Freeze Damage
Knowing wet bulb temperature could help farmers protect crops from hard freezes while saving money, water and energy.
Healthy peanuts compared to peanuts infected with white mold disease. CAES News
La Nina Weather Pattern
A La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.
This 2015 photo shows sunburnt watermelons in a Tift County field. Watermelons can get sunburn if the vines aren't receiving enough water, which leads to wilting that makes fruit vulnerable to sun exposure. CAES News
Watermelon Vine Protection
Whether protecting watermelons from the scalding summer sun or helping plants produce bigger fruit, maintaining healthy vines is a top priority for Georgia growers, especially when farm workers continuously pick from the same fruit bed.
As part of the LepNet project, Joe McHugh, professor of entomology at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and curator of the arthropod collection at the Georgia Museum of Natural History, will help lead the effort to digitize millions of butterfly and moth specimens now locked away in museum collections across the nation. CAES News
Museum Collection Digitized
Locked in museums across the world, millions of insect specimens tell the story of the world’s climatic shifts, animals on the move and changing fauna.
Parts of north Georgia received between 10 and 15 inches of rain during August. CAES News
August Climate
Rainfall in August reduced the area of extreme drought in northern Georgia. However, abnormally dry conditions and drought expanded in central and south Georgia, especially in coastal areas.
This summer has seen the second or third warmest June-July period on record for much of the state. Temperatures ranged from almost 2 to 3.5 degrees above the 1981-2010 average. CAES News
Too Hot, Too Dry
About 65 percent of Georgia is experiencing some level of abnormally dry weather or drought, and there are no signs it will break before October.
CAES News
Hotter than Normal
Summer began in Georgia with warmer than normal temperatures throughout the state and shows no signs of relenting before fall.
CAES News
Scaly, Slimy Saturday
Have you ever wondered where turtles go in the winter or why salamanders have slimy skin? Focusing on species native to Georgia, this Scaly Slimy Saturday at the Rock experience is sure to answer all of your questions.
While many of Georgia's 63 species of mosquito thrive in wet weather, southern house mosquitoes — which transmit West Nile virus — prefer dry or even drought conditions. CAES News
West Nile Virus
With its shocking impact on babies and mothers, the Zika virus has gotten a lot of attention. However, some entomologists are looking at the current, abnormally dry weather and becoming concerned that another mosquito-borne illness could become a threat later this summer.
While some parts of the state saw 10 inches more rain than normal during May, northwestern Georgia had more than three inches less rain than the average. CAES News
North Georgia Drought
In May 2016, most of Georgia suffered from a lack of rainfall, while record-setting rain fell in Savannah, Georgia. Drought conditions expanded statewide, and severe drought returned to the northwest corner of Georgia by the end of last month.