Browse Climate Stories - Page 6

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After a dry summer, parts of south Georgia received as much as 8 inches more than their average rainfall this September. CAES News
September Rains
Drought decreased slightly across south Georgia in September as heavier-than-normal rainfall brought some relief to dry areas, but the rain hindered farmers working their fields. According to the National Drought Monitor, the percentage of the state covered by drought decreased from 20 percent to 15 percent.
CAES News
August Weather
Most areas of Georgia received well below normal rainfall in August, leading to expansion of dry conditions and the appearance of severe drought in southern Georgia by the end of the month. Wet conditions were confined to the Atlanta metro area, regions to the northwest and a small part of northern Pierce County. Temperatures were near normal across the state.
This is a file photo of a center pivot irrigation system being used. CAES News
Georgia Drought
A summer drought combined with scorching temperatures have Georgia farmers feeling the heat, says University of Georgia’s agricultural climatologist Pam Knox.
July 2014 Monthly departure from normal precipitation. CAES News
July Weather Update
A small area of drought returned to Georgia at the end of last month, following a record-setting dry July in Alma. A record low maximum temperature of 80 degrees F was reported in Brunswick on July 12 and a record high temperature of 97 degrees was recorded there, too, on July 3.
While the northwest corner of Georgia saw rainfall that was sometimes four or five inches above normal for June, some areas of the southwest saw rainfall four or five inches below normal. CAES News
June Climate
While 2013 gave Georgians a break from the state’s usual sweltering summer temperatures, summer 2014 is shaping up to be more of a standard-issue Georgia scorcher.
Co-authored by Thomas Foken, Monique Leclerc's book, Footprints in Micrometeorology and Ecology, is the first textbook on the subject and covers how to interpret meteorological measurements made at a given level over a surface with regard to characteristic properties such as roughness, albedo, heat, moisture, carbon dioxide and other gases. CAES News
Micrometeorology Textbook
Some landscapes — like forests — are known for keeping carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Others shed carbon dioxide or other gasses that can affect the environment. Calculating just how much of each gas is held or released can be difficult but University of Georgia scientist Monique Leclerc has literally written the book on the subject.
While parts of Georgia received periodic downpours connected to spring thunder showers, most of Georgia received normal amounts of rainfall during May. CAES News
May 2014 Climate
May was a near-average month for both temperature and precipitation across the state. While some areas saw heavy downpours associated with springtime thunderstorms, the relatively drier conditions allowed farmers to finish working in their fields and planting after the wet spring.
Georgia experienced the fourth-wettest April on record this year. While the rain should boost soil moisture across the state, it made it difficult for farmers in South Georgia to get out into their fields to plant cotton and peanuts. CAES News
April Showers
April was significantly wetter than normal across most of the state, which recharged soil moisture but delayed planting of some summer crops.
CAES News
New Climate Blog
For the past two years, Georgia agricultural climatologist Pam Knox has kept Georgians up to date on the way the state’s climate impacts the state’s largest industry.
Agricultural climatologist Pam Knox's office is filled with volumes of old weather observations. These book contain the original hand written weather statistics from Atlanta in the beginning of the 20th century. CAES News
Changing Climate
The changing climate is affecting trends in weather across the nation. As temperatures in the Southeast rise, farmers will have to adjust to longer growing seasons, more diseases and pests and to an increase in extreme weather conditions, says a University of Georgia expert.