Browse Drought Stories - Page 3

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Don Shilling, left, head of the University of Georgia department of crop and soil sciences, and Rosario Rizzuto, rector of the University of Padova, sign an agreement finalizing a duel master's degree program between the universities. CAES News
Sustainable Ag Master's Degree
To promote collaboration on some of the biggest challenges facing agriculture today, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is partnering with the University of Padova in Italy for a groundbreaking dual master’s degree program in sustainable agriculture.
Keynote speaker Ann M. Steensland, deputy director of the Global Harvest Initiative, told students and faculty that successful solutions for feeding the world's hungry have to be created in concert with the farmers and community members on the ground in developing countries and in our own backyard. CAES News
International Ag Reception
From rice fields in western Africa to sheep pastures in Uruguay, students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental sciences travel the world each year to learn how to build a more food-secure future. CAES faculty, students and administrators gathered Tuesday to celebrate the college’s international mission and accomplishments at the sixth annual International Agriculture Day reception.
March saw temperatures that were 3 to 6 degrees above normal through out the state. CAES News
March Climate
March was drier and warmer than normal across Georgia, ushering in projections for a warmer and wetter than normal spring.
Ann M. Steensland, deputy director for the Global Harvest Initiative, will deliver the keynote address at this year's Sixth Annual International Agriculture Day Reception. The event will be held from 3:30-5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 19, at the Georgia Museum of Art. CAES News
Food Security in Focus
Ann M. Steensland, deputy director for the Global Harvest Initiative, will deliver the keynote address at this year’s Sixth Annual International Agriculture Day reception. The event will be held from 3:30-5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 19, at the Georgia Museum of Art. Hosted by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Global Programs, the talk and reception are free and open to the public.
Over the course of February, swaths of northwest and southeast Georgia received as much as three or four inches more rainfall than normal, leaving some farm fields that have reached the planting milestone of 55 degrees Fahrenheit too wet to plant. CAES News
February's Variable Rains
Overly wet weather in Georgia’s major row crop regions during February 2016 has farmers worried that soggy soil may delay corn and peanut planting or cause fungal diseases to be a major issue later this spring.
Although January was drier than normal across the state, some areas of Georgia, specifically Atlanta and Alma, received more rain than normal. CAES News
January Climate
After a record-setting warm December 2015, January 2016 in Georgia was slightly cooler and drier than normal. While El Niño conditions mean a continuation of slightly cooler-than-normal conditions in February, it should also mean a wetter-than-normal month.
December 2015 was much warmer than normal across the southeastern United States. CAES News
December 2015
2015 saw one of the warmest Decembers since Georgians started keeping records, and the month was also much wetter than normal. The warm, wet conditions created havoc for Georgia farmers.
Some parts of Georgia received more than 10 inches more rain than usual during November 2015. CAES News
November Rains
November 2015 was one of the 10 wettest, warmest Novembers on record for Georgia. Some areas of the state received as much as 10 inches more rain than is normal, and temperatures were generally 3 to 7 degrees above normal.
Sangaya Rajaram and Norman Borlaug working in wheat fields in Mexico. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Lecture
In a time of public debate over the effectiveness and safety of genetically modified foods, it’s hard to picture the era before crop breeders developed grain varieties that could withstand drought and common diseases.
While isolated areas of Georgia saw more rain than normal, the vast majority of the state received 1 to 3 inches less rain than normal during September 2015. CAES News
September Climate
Despite Georgians’ constant umbrella use of late, most of September 2015 was actually drier than normal.