Browse Drought Stories - Page 7

116 results found for Drought
An August 30, 2012 map detailing the precipitation over Georgia since Aug. 22. CAES News
Hurricane Isaac
Forecasters initially projected that rains from Hurricane Isaac could erase or at least put a large dent in Georgia’s drought, but the state has seen little relief.
Mosquitoes feed on sugar water in Mark Brown's endocrinology lab on UGA's Athens campus. CAES News
West Nile virus outbreaks
West Nile virus usually peaks between Aug. 15 and Sep. 15 in Georgia, but this year doctors are seeing an earlier start. Entomologists and public health officials are worried that a near record number of Georgians will be sickened with West Nile virus this year.
Map showing precipitation totals across Georgia in July 2012. CAES News
July climate summary
Drought conditions in most parts of the state stabilized in July, although there was an increase in exceptional drought in west-central Georgia due to the heat and lack of rainfall.
Dr. Mike Lacy, department head, University of Georgia Department of Poultry Science CAES News
High corn costs
Severe drought in the Midwest corn-belt is driving up poultry feed costs in Georgia. Economists and poultry industry experts predict corn costs will increase 50 percent in 2012 compared to typical years. Some economists say corn prices could double by the end of the summer.
Sorghum plant growing in the field. CAES News
Biofuels research grants
In the ongoing search for cleaner, renewable energy sources, biofuels derived from trees, shrubs and grasses have emerged as a strong candidate. But creating the next generation’s energy source is not as simple as growing a few crops; extensive research is required to ensure these plants produce enough biomass and fuel per acre to make biomass farming economically viable.
Agricultural climatologist Pam Knox's office is filled with volumes of old weather observations. These book contain the original hand written weather statistics from Atlanta in the beginning of the 20th century. CAES News
Agriculture and climate
Farmers can’t control when drought, a late freeze or violent crop-wrenching storms will affect their fields, but they can be prepared when those disasters come knocking.
Soil moisture conditions in the southern half of the state are generally at the fifth percentile, meaning the soils at the end of May would be wetter 95 out of 100 years. CAES News
Drought Impact
The widespread drought that’s made national headlines this week will probably be a boon for some Georgia corn producers, but a costly burden for the state’s poultry and beef industries.
UGA soil scientists Leticia Sonon and David Kissel recently traveled to Haiti to help set up a soil-testing lab and to teach several teachers and school officials how use the equipment.
Haitian agriculture expert Eddy-Jean Etienne, far left in front, traveled to Athens in March to train with Kissel and Sonon, so that he could help supervise the lab. CAES News
Haiti Soil Lab
The new soil-testing lab at the Zanmi Agricol Learning Center Fritz Lafontant in Corporant, Haiti isn’t sophisticated.B but it works, and that’s enough to change the lives of many Haitian farmers.
Areas of north Georgia affected by Tropical Storm Debby in June 2012 CAES News
June weather
In spite of record-setting high temperatures at the end of the month, June was slightly cooler than normal in Georgia. Rainfall across the state varied greatly as Tropical Storm Debby dumped more than 10 inches on the southern half, but left north Georgia dry.
A crowd browses the Trial Gardens at UGA at an industry open house earlier this summer. The gardens are expected to be in full bloom for the public open house on July 9. CAES News
Trial gardens
Over the last three decades, the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia have introduced home gardeners and landscape designers to thousands of new plant varieties.