Browse Invasive Species Stories - Page 2

35 results found for Invasive Species
As part of the LepNet project, Joe McHugh, professor of entomology at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and curator of the arthropod collection at the Georgia Museum of Natural History, will help lead the effort to digitize millions of butterfly and moth specimens now locked away in museum collections across the nation. CAES News
Museum Collection Digitized
Locked in museums across the world, millions of insect specimens tell the story of the world’s climatic shifts, animals on the move and changing fauna.
Rows of cotton at a farm on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus in 2013. CAES News
Insect Scouting
Georgia farmers and agriculture consultants hoping to refine their scouting skills are invited to this year’s Insect Scout Schools, hosted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. The schools will be held in Tifton on Monday, June 13, and in Midville on Tuesday, June 21.
Overwintering kudzu bugs discovered in pine bark. CAES News
Kudzu Bug Decline
Once a nuisance for soybean farmers in the Southeast, kudzu bug populations appear to be declining in the U.S. The decline began in 2014 and is believed to have been brought on by two of the kudzu bug’s natural predators: a fungus and a wasp.
Johnsongrass, known scientifically as Sorghum halepense, grows happily in a field it invaded. The weed continues to cause millions of dollars in lost agricultural revenue each year. CAES News
Combatting Johnsongrass
A team of researchers led by faculty at the University of Georgia have received a $5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to find new ways of combating Johnsongrass, one of the most widespread and troublesome agricultural weeds in the world.
Many Georgians are confusing the common wheel bug, which is beneficial in Georgia gardens, with the kissing bug, which made news earlier this fall. CAES News
Kissing Bugs
Over the last few weeks, many Georgians have focused their attention on the media-hyped coverage of the kissing bug. Much of the sensationalism and worry surrounding this insect boogieman is unwarranted, according to University of Georgia entomologists.
UGA entomologist Ashfaq Sial inspects a blueberry bush for damage. CAES News
Spotted Wing Drosophila
A tiny fly is having a huge impact on American fruit farmers. Known as spotted wing drosophila, the insect is costing famers more than $700 million a year in lost produce and prevention costs.
Most Georgians have fond childhood memories of honeysuckle vines, but the species of the fragrant vine that is most common is actually an invasive. CAES News
Invasive Flowers
If you’ve driven down the road alongside an overgrown fence or forested area in north Georgia lately, you were likely overwhelmed with a combination of fragrance from wild Japanese honeysuckle and Chinese privet. Many people assume they are native because they are so common, but neither one belongs on this continent. Both originated in Asia and were introduced to North America in the 1800s for ornamental uses in landscaping.
Jason Schmidt is UGA Tifton's newest entomologist. CAES News
UGA Entomologist
The University of Georgia’s newest entomologist is eyeing a different approach to studying insects in multiple agricultural crops. Instead of focusing on how to eliminate pests that reduce yield and negatively impact profits, UGA entomologist Jason Schmidt is looking to improve agricultural management systems to preserve helpful insects.
A new app has been developed to better treat and manage stink bugs in cotton. CAES News
Stink Bug App

A new app, developed for smartphones and tablets by researchers and Extension personnel with University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, allows farmers and scouts to save time and money by finding and using the most effective treatments available for stink bugs.

University of Georgia Extension agent Mark Freeman, right, and Kris Irwin, who teaches in UGA's Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, seine for fish during a training for south Georgia Extension agents on Sept. 26, 2014. CAES News
Forestry/Fisheries Training
South Georgia foresters and landowners connected to the $600 million per year forestry industry will now receive better guidance from University of Georgia Extension agents thanks to a recently held UGA forestry and fisheries management training course.