Browse Invasive Species Stories - Page 3

35 results found for Invasive Species
CAES News
Legacy Tree Project
Hulking above their neighbors in the Chattahoochee National Forest, Georgia’s century-old hemlocks are giants. But the relatively scarce, trees are quickly being felled by the tiniest of insects — the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid.
The University of Georgia Insect Zoo Open House will feature a photo booth, live bug exhibits, roach races, beetle tractor pulls and more. Daring visitors can try tasty snacks made from insects. CAES News
Insect Zoo
The University of Georgia Bug Dawgs of the UGA Entomology Department will host the 29th Annual Insect Zoo Open House on Friday, April 4 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of the Miller Plant Science Building on the campus in Athens.
Mark McClure, Forest Health Specialist with the Georgia Forestry Commission, talks with members of a Chinese Delegation during a trip to south Georgia last month. CAES News
Invasive Species
When we think of invasive species we usually think of insects, plants and animals that have been shipped to Georgia from another part of the world, but it’s a two-way street. Georgia’s native plants and insects can be just as devastating overseas if they take root in a foreign ecosystem
UGA researchers and an Athens-based citizen scientist have identified the largest mushroom species in the Western Hemisphere growing in Athens. Macrocybe titans was previously only found in tropical and subtropical climates. CAES News
Giant Mushrooms
With mushroom caps that can be as large as trashcan lids, the gigantic fungus Macrocybe titans looks like something from outer space, but it may be popping up soon in a lawn near you.
Mobile applications are a way for farmers to identify unwanted pests in their fields. CAES News
Smart phone apps
Is there an unwanted insect or plant on your farm or in your garden that you don’t recognize? The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has an app for that.
Stack of seasoned firewood CAES News
Invasive species
As outdoor enthusiasts start making their pack lists for spring camping trips, it’s a good time to think about what shouldn’t be taken on camping ventures: invasive species.
2012 World Food Prize Laureate and UGA CAES alumnus Daniel Hillel will deliver the 2012 DW Brooks Lecture on Nov. 8. CAES News
Daniel Hillel
Daniel Hillel, the 2012 World Food Prize Laureate and a 1950 graduate of the University of Georgia, spent the better part of his career perfecting arid- land farming methods in Israel and sharing them with farmers across the Middle East, Africa and parts of Asia. On Nov. 8, Hillel will return to Athens to deliver the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ 2012 D.W. Brooks Lecture at the Georgia Center for Continuing Education.
A European Pepper Moth found in Tifton, Ga. in October 2011. CAES News
New invasive species spotted in 2011
A new insect thought to threaten Georgia's pepper production at the moment poses a greater danger to lantana - a popular landscape plant.
Photos of goats cleaning up the banks of Tanyard Creek near Baxter Street in Athens. Students from the UGA College of Environment and Design installed the goats as part of service-learning project. CAES News
Targeted grazing
Goats and sheep have a reputation for eating vegetation that most other grazing animals would not touch. This trait makes them invaluable to people who need to raise livestock in tough climates, but it’s also made them popular for landowners who need to clear brush or invasive plants from overgrown parcels.
A stream runs through the Westbrook Farm at the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Land conservation
The Conserve Research Program helps landowners protect their land – a precious natural resource. But landowners can’t participate if they don’t know about the program.