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On Feb. 17, NOAA's Climate Prediction Center released its latest three-month climate outlook, which includes the seasonal temperature forecast for the U.S. The map above represents the probability that temperatures will be above or below normal by location. CAES News
Growing Season Outlook
Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center (CPC) released its latest three-month climate outlook for the United States. What does this mean for conditions in the Southeast in the coming growing season?
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Winter Weather
While some U.S. regions, such as the Northeast and Midwest, have experienced consistent cold throughout the winter of 2022, the Southeast region, including Georgia, has seen a winter with varied temperatures. Those unpredictable temperatures, alongside moisture and frost, may have had a direct impact on plant survival, as plants’ ability to thrive or perish is ultimately determined by the weather.
Pam Knox visits a UGA weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Annual Weather Review
In 2021, Georgia experienced its coldest year since 2014, with an average temperature of 64.5 degrees Fahrenheit. But the temperature was still well above the long-term average of 63.4 F and ranked the 20th warmest year overall since statewide records began in 1895.
wintertime la nina pattern CAES News
La Nina
December is the start of the three-month winter season here in the Northern Hemisphere. In 2021, December started out 4 to 6 degrees Fahrenheit (F) warmer than normal. Whether this is likely to last through the rest of the winter depends on two major weather patterns that are affecting the winter climate in Georgia.
UGA Weather Network Director Pam Knox checks one of the data-logger boxes maintained by the network. All of the observational instruments connect to the data-logger, which collects and transmits weather data at 15-minute intervals, which is then disseminated through the UGA Weather Network website. CAES News
UGA Weather Network
On June 1, 1991, the first agricultural weather station operated by the University of Georgia began transmitting data from Griffin, Georgia. Since then, the UGA Weather Network has grown to include 87 stations scattered across the state, providing weather data to a variety of users. On June 1 this year, this 30-year record of continuous weather data makes the UGA Weather Network one of the oldest state weather networks in the country.
Boxwood blight symptoms clockwise from upper left: tan to gray leaf lesions with a darker purplish border on an English boxwood; circular, tan spots with a brown border on upper leaves; tan blighted leaves and bare stems on an infected plant; blackening of stems and browning foliage; and black stem lesions on bare branch tips. (photos by Jean Williams-Woodward) CAES News
Landscape Plant Diseases
If you're seeing brown areas in your landscape trees or hedges where you should be seeing green, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension can help. Wet winters and severe weather have been causing disease and other issues in landscape plants, especially Leyland cypress and boxwood.
Preparing for the worst is the key to quicker disaster recovery. It's important for inland residents to plan for severe storms like Hurricane Michael, which caused extensive damage to southwest Georgia, pictured here in 2018. CAES News
Hurricane Preparedness
Between dealing with the ongoing COVID-19 crisis and early indications of an especially active hurricane season, University of Georgia experts urge citizens to prepare early and remain prepared for weather-related emergencies.
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
Emergency Food
News of the coronavirus has many people feeling uneasy and helpless. Building a supply of emergency food and water is a task University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say will help Georgians prepare for any kind of emergency, be it a medical quarantine, a snowstorm or a major power outage.
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Record Rainfall
Bright green grass across the fields, lawns and roadsides of northern and central Georgia is making those parts of the state look more like Ireland than a typical Georgia in February. Copious rain, coupled with periods of much warmer-than-normal temperatures, is waking up plants early and causing them to green up.
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes. CAES News
Sketchy Weather
Georgia weather is predictably unpredictable, bitter cold one week and balmy the next. For that reason, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts urge Georgia growers to pay close attention to the weather over the coming months and be prepared to use irrigation for frost protection and potential dry conditions as we move into spring.