Browse Weather Stories - Page 11

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Here's a closeup picture of blueberries being grown in Alapaha. Picture taken in May, 2013. CAES News
Blueberry Freeze
Early blueberry varieties felt the chill of deep freezes during January and February, according to University of Georgia blueberry specialist Erick Smith.
CAES News
Tropical Storms
Tropical storms may cause havoc for coastal homeowners, but the rainfall they bring recharges the water balance and keeps soil moist in the summer, according to University of Georgia climatologist Pam Knox. Lack of tropical storm activity in 2014 contributed to Georgia’s prolonged drought, she said.
A warm and wet December helped to rid the state of the moderate drought conditions that had dogged southwest Georgia farmers through out the fall. CAES News
Warm December
After a bone chilling November, Georgia saw warmer and wetter weather in December. The rain eliminated drought across the state, although some patches of abnormally dry conditions were still present at the end of the month.
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Georgia Pecans
Too much, and then too little, rain left Georgia pecan growers with smaller and, sometimes, empty nuts this season. The small size of pecans in the crop this year is expected to significantly impact the state’s overall production.
Pictured is George Vellidis in one of his introductory precision ag classes from previous years on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Specialized Academic Courses
The addition of specialized agriscience and environmental systems courses — precision agriculture, sustainable agriculture and plant breeding/genetics — is expected to bolster already strong academic programs at the University of Georgia Athens and Tifton campuses.
Nighttime spraying is recommended by UGA plant pathologists in treating peanuts for white mold disease. CAES News
Nighttime/Early Morning Spraying
A University of Georgia plant pathologist is advocating nighttime and early morning fungicide application as an option to combat white mold disease, a perennially devastating disease for Georgia peanut farmers.
Sleet encases a branch of a leyland cypress tree in Jackson, Ga. CAES News
Cold Plants
Landscape plants get plenty of attention during the summer, but they need protection during Georgia’s winter months. Rather than trying to keep plants warm, gardeners should help protect plants from wind, snow, ice, drastic soil temperature changes and heat from the sun on cold days.
After a dry summer, parts of south Georgia received as much as 8 inches more than their average rainfall this September. CAES News
September Rains
Drought decreased slightly across south Georgia in September as heavier-than-normal rainfall brought some relief to dry areas, but the rain hindered farmers working their fields. According to the National Drought Monitor, the percentage of the state covered by drought decreased from 20 percent to 15 percent.
Pictured is a pecan affected by scab disease. CAES News
Pecan Scab Resistance
A major disease plaguing Georgia’s pecan crop, scab is a growing problem for state producers due to increasing resistance to the fungicides used to control the disease.
Mercy Butao, from Malawi, Africa, checks out peanuts during a stop on the Georgia Peanut Tour two years ago. CAES News
Georgia Peanut Tour
The annual Georgia Peanut Tour, held Sept. 16 to Sept. 18 in southeast Georgia, is a major attraction for the nation’s peanut industry, and attracts a number of international visitors.