Browse Weather Stories - Page 13

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While the northwest corner of Georgia saw rainfall that was sometimes four or five inches above normal for June, some areas of the southwest saw rainfall four or five inches below normal. CAES News
June Climate
While 2013 gave Georgians a break from the state’s usual sweltering summer temperatures, summer 2014 is shaping up to be more of a standard-issue Georgia scorcher.
Co-authored by Thomas Foken, Monique Leclerc's book, Footprints in Micrometeorology and Ecology, is the first textbook on the subject and covers how to interpret meteorological measurements made at a given level over a surface with regard to characteristic properties such as roughness, albedo, heat, moisture, carbon dioxide and other gases. CAES News
Micrometeorology Textbook
Some landscapes — like forests — are known for keeping carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Others shed carbon dioxide or other gasses that can affect the environment. Calculating just how much of each gas is held or released can be difficult but University of Georgia scientist Monique Leclerc has literally written the book on the subject.
Rows of cotton at a farm on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus in 2013. CAES News
Cotton Planting
Prolonged periods of rainfall this spring sidelined cotton farmers from planting their crop as planned for the week of April 28.
Agricultural climatologist Pam Knox's office is filled with volumes of old weather observations. These book contain the original hand written weather statistics from Atlanta in the beginning of the 20th century. CAES News
Changing Climate
The changing climate is affecting trends in weather across the nation. As temperatures in the Southeast rise, farmers will have to adjust to longer growing seasons, more diseases and pests and to an increase in extreme weather conditions, says a University of Georgia expert.
A watermelon plant is pictured in a field in Ty Ty, Ga. on Wednesday, April 30. The plant was planted on March 28. CAES News
Watermelon Crop
An abundance of rainfall hurt last year’s watermelon crop in Georgia. This year, late cold snaps stunted the growth of early-planted melons and may cause prices to plummet, say University of Georgia Extension experts.
This is a file photo of a center pivot irrigation system being used. CAES News
Water Conservation Project
Researchers in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are teaming up with IBM to work with farmers in Georgia’s Lower Flint River Basin to enhance water efficiency by up to 20 percent.
CAES News
Cotton Irrigation App
A new smartphone app developed by University of Georgia and University of Florida researchers will help cotton farmers in their states save one of nature’s most precious resources — water.
University of Georgia Extension water resource specialist Gary Hawkins looks over a solar panel. CAES News
Solar Power
Using the sun as a power source isn’t a new concept. But for some Georgia farmers, implementing solar power to deliver water to remote locations is making a huge difference.
Despite a few nights with single-digit low temperatures, Georgia experienced a near normal winter. CAES News
Average Winter
Despite some bone-chilling days with single digit lows, Georgia’s winter was about average in both temperature and precipitation.
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Georgia Pecan Crop
Georgia’s 2013 pecan crop was not as plentiful as farmers hoped for, and one University of Georgia expert says this year’s crop could be even worse — if history repeats itself.