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Sandbags work to keep the sea at bay in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. University of Georgia scientist Craig Landry says there are places along the coast that are so at risk of eroding that they are pushed to embrace a "phased retreat."  Tourists could stop coming because of beach erosion and homeowners would sell because they can't afford insurance, or they are worried about losing their investment, he said. CAES News
Coastal Study
University of Georgia natural resource economist Craig Landry will use his portion of a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study how the economy and the environment are affected when humans and coastal regions commingle. The four-year project is a team effort with researchers from Colorado, North Carolina and Ohio.
Cotton plants blown over from Tropical Storm Irma's winds on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Cotton Crop
Georgia’s cotton crop sustained at least $100 million in losses following Irma’s trek across the state, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist Jared Whitaker.
Pecans being researched on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. CAES News
Pecan Crop
The Southeast is in Hurricane Irma’s crosshairs, and Georgia pecan farmers are bracing for the hurricane’s potential impact on this year’s crop.
Displaced cattle seek higher ground during Hurricane Harvey in Brazoria County, Texas. Livestock will seek higher ground during flooding, but unfortunately, farmers can't relocate their crops. CAES News
Prepare & Evacuate
If a mandatory evacuation is declared in your area, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent Tim Davis says residents should prepare to be away from home for a few weeks.
High winds uprooted a large oak tree on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Hurricane Preparedness
Hurricane Irma strengthened to a Category 5 storm with sustained winds of 175 mph as of Monday, Sept. 5. It’s moving west-northwest on its present track, but longer-term models project that it will make a sharp turn to the north later this week, which could threaten parts of the Southeast, including Georgia.
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply. CAES News
Upper Floridan Aquifer
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply.
Rainfall in Georgia during April was highly varied. Some southern parts of the state received 2-3 inches less rain than normal, while parts of north Georgia received as many as 4 inches above normal. CAES News
Record Highs
April brought plentiful spring showers to north Georgia but little rainfall to the southern half of the state, resulting in moderate drought conditions, delayed planting, and conditions conducive to wildfires near the Okefenokee Swamp.
Pesticide use is critical in controlling pests like thrips, whiteflies, aphids and beet armyworms. CAES News
Drift complaints
As a result of two years of aggressive training to improve on-target agricultural pesticide applications, the number of pesticide drift complaints received by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has gone down 65 percent, according to UGA Extension weed specialist Stanley Culpepper.
Healthy peanuts compared to peanuts infected with white mold disease. CAES News
La Nina Weather Pattern
A La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.
A damaged irrigation pivot in Thomas County, Georgia. Credit: Jim Rayburn CAES News
Storm Damage
Deadly storms that ravaged much of south Georgia Jan. 20-22 also damaged or destroyed many irrigation pivots that supply needed water to agricultural crops.