Browse Weather Stories - Page 7

256 results found for Weather
CAES News
Hotter than Normal
Summer began in Georgia with warmer than normal temperatures throughout the state and shows no signs of relenting before fall.
While many of Georgia's 63 species of mosquito thrive in wet weather, southern house mosquitoes — which transmit West Nile virus — prefer dry or even drought conditions. CAES News
West Nile Virus
With its shocking impact on babies and mothers, the Zika virus has gotten a lot of attention. However, some entomologists are looking at the current, abnormally dry weather and becoming concerned that another mosquito-borne illness could become a threat later this summer.
While some parts of the state saw 10 inches more rain than normal during May, northwestern Georgia had more than three inches less rain than the average. CAES News
North Georgia Drought
In May 2016, most of Georgia suffered from a lack of rainfall, while record-setting rain fell in Savannah, Georgia. Drought conditions expanded statewide, and severe drought returned to the northwest corner of Georgia by the end of last month.
Southern Regional Extension Forestry (SREF), in collaboration with eXtension, an online learning resource for Cooperative Extension System professionals, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have launched the Climate Learning Network (CLN) website — a clearinghouse for the most up-to-date climate information for farmers, homeowners, natural resources professionals and Extension personnel. CAES News
Climate Learning Network
Southern Regional Extension Forestry (SREF), in collaboration with eXtension, an online learning resource for Cooperative Extension System professionals, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have launched the Climate Learning Network (CLN) website, climatelearning.net, as a clearinghouse for the most up-to-date information for farmers, homeowners, natural resources professionals and Extension personnel.
Professor Nick Hill harvests corn from his test plots at the J. Phil Campbell Research and Education Center in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Corn Boil
The University of Georgia faculty and staff at the J. Phil Campbell Sr. Research and Education Center in Watkinsville will host the center’s annual corn boil and open house on June 28 from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Georgia watermelons harvested for delivery. CAES News
Late Watermelons
The late-season market for Georgia watermelons is typically small, but could be critical for some Georgia farmers affected by a recent hailstorm in south Georgia, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong.
An overhead view of variable rate irrigation and soil moisture sensor research at Adam McLendon's farm. CAES News
Variable Rate Irrigation
The combination of soil moisture sensors and variable rate irrigation (VRI) may help some Georgia farmers increase their yields while decreasing their water usage, according to an ongoing study by University of Georgia precision agriculture specialist George Vellidis and irrigation specialist Wes Porter.
Georgia's April 2016 Precipitation - NOAA CAES News
April Weather
Cool conditions early in April delayed the growth of watermelon seedlings and caused yellowing of some corn plants. Wet fields in the southern half of the state delayed planting and caused problems for corn seedlings and other plants in heavy, wet soils.
Don Shilling, left, head of the University of Georgia department of crop and soil sciences, and Rosario Rizzuto, rector of the University of Padova, sign an agreement finalizing a duel master's degree program between the universities. CAES News
Sustainable Ag Master's Degree
To promote collaboration on some of the biggest challenges facing agriculture today, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is partnering with the University of Padova in Italy for a groundbreaking dual master’s degree program in sustainable agriculture.
Georgia watermelons harvested for delivery. CAES News
Watermelon Planting
Winter’s mild temperatures and sunny days helped some Georgia farmers keep from falling behind with their watermelon plantings this spring, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong.