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Pictured is an eggplant fruit. CAES News
Eggplant Production
Eggplant producers should consider decreasing their current irrigation usage, according to University of Georgia research horticulturist Juan Carlos Díaz-Pérez. Doing so saves water and money.
December 2015 was much warmer than normal across the southeastern United States. CAES News
December 2015
2015 saw one of the warmest Decembers since Georgians started keeping records, and the month was also much wetter than normal. The warm, wet conditions created havoc for Georgia farmers.
When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes. CAES News
Well Testing
Much of Georgia was wetter than normal during November 2015, and with all that rain there’s a chance some runoff may have contaminated private wells around the state. While an odd taste, corrosion and staining are signs of water contamination, most contaminants aren’t readily detectible. Ensuring the safety and quality of your well water requires laboratory testing.
Cotton is dumped into a trailer at the Gibbs Farm in Tifton on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. CAES News
Cotton Update
End-of-year rainfall and poor harvest conditions have been tough on Georgia’s cotton crop and tested Georgia’s cotton farmers, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s new cotton agronomist.
Some parts of Georgia received more than 10 inches more rain than usual during November 2015. CAES News
November Rains
November 2015 was one of the 10 wettest, warmest Novembers on record for Georgia. Some areas of the state received as much as 10 inches more rain than is normal, and temperatures were generally 3 to 7 degrees above normal.
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Pecan Crop
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells fears Georgia’s pecan crop will fail to meet initial production projections by as much as 20 million pounds.
Pictured are pumpkins growing on the UGA Tifton Campus in 2014. CAES News
Growing Pumpkins
High temperatures, humid nights and disease pressure make growing pumpkins difficult for south Georgia farmers, according to Tim Coolong, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist.
While isolated areas of Georgia saw more rain than normal, the vast majority of the state received 1 to 3 inches less rain than normal during September 2015. CAES News
September Climate
Despite Georgians’ constant umbrella use of late, most of September 2015 was actually drier than normal.
Cotton is dumped into a trailer at the Gibbs Farm in Tifton on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. CAES News
El Niño
An impending El Niño weather pattern could negatively impact Georgia farmers’ abilities to harvest their peanut and cotton crops, according to University of Georgia climatologist Pam Knox.
Sub-surface drip irrigation gets implemented in a field at Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camilla, Georgia. CAES News
Sub-Surface Drip Irrigation
Drip irrigation systems have long helped Georgia vegetable farmers grow high yielding crops. Sub-surface drip irrigation can help some Georgia peanut farmers water their crops more efficiently, according to a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension expert. And, it won’t interfere with peanut digging equipment.