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Most of the time, covers are used to reduce frost damage, while freeze damage depends on the plant species. CAES News
Cold Protection Options
Whether you’re a home gardener or a production farmer, Georgia’s mild climate allows for a variety of fruits and vegetables to be grown throughout the year. However, with erratic weather events and broad temperature swings during the winter and early spring months, having a few cold protection resources on hand can help you weather the unpredictability.
From left, UGA FoodPIC Director Jim Gratzek displays the front and back of a bottled sample of the minimally processed Georgia-made satsuma orange juice. (Photo by Ashley Biles) CAES News
Satsuma Orange Juice
If you’ve ever wished that the orange juice you buy from the grocery store tasted like you squeezed it yourself — and stayed fresh at home — you may be interested in an electrifying project at the Food Product Innovation and Commercialization Center on the University of Georgia Griffin campus. Food technology company Food Physics is working with FoodPIC scientists to perfect a technique known as pulsed electric field technology.
Ganaspis brasiliensis CAES News
SWD Biocontrol
In a quiet field of abandoned blueberries and shrubby brush in south Georgia, Cera Jones released hundreds of tiny parasitoid wasps into the thicket and watched them fly away, following their natural instinct in search of a host to incubate their predatory progeny.
Adult plum curculio (Photo by Brett Blaauw) CAES News
Plum Curculio
With the onset of warmer, longer days, an array of pink blooms from peach, cherry and plum trees break forth — the first signs of spring. And while most of us enjoy this seasonal shift, fruit tree growers prepare their orchards for the relentless, annual migration of insect pests.
How sweet it is to be a Georgia-grown satsuma orange! (Photo by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA) CAES News
Seedless Citrus
Wayne Hanna, a legend in the plant breeding world, specifically with turfgrass, retired from the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 2002. He immediately joined the faculty at the University of Georgia’s Tifton campus. When he arrived, he asked the assistant dean if he could work on developing a cold-tolerant citrus tree that produced seedless fruit. “Go ahead” was the answer.
Tomatoes, in varying stages of ripeness, growing on a tomato plant. CAES News
Fruit or Veggie
From an early age, we’re told by our parents to make sure we eat our vegetables. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends that people eat five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables per day. However, there’s long been confusion around what is a vegetable versus a fruit. So, when is a vegetable actually a fruit — or a root or a shoot?
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas. CAES News
Preserving Citrus Productivity
With commercial citrus acreage on the rise in Georgia, producers should be aware of potential signs of citrus greening and the pests that carry the disease that has devastated the citrus industry in Florida.
On March 1, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will welcome Cain Hickey, the state's first full-time Extension viticulturist. CAES News
40 Under 40
Since arriving at the University of Georgia Department of Horticulture in 2017, viticulture researcher Cain Hickey has helped make UGA Cooperative Extension the go-to source for wine growing expertise in the Southeast. 
Angelos Deltsidis, who is originally from Greece, earned his doctoral degree at the University of Florida. In his new position at UGA, he'll show how commodities thrive under different storage conditions, temperatures and atmospheres. CAES News
Postharvest Specialist
The newest crop specialist on the University of Georgia Tifton campus hopes to help Georgia fruit and vegetable farmers extend the shelf life of their produce after harvest.
In addition to produce safety procedures, UGA Extension helps farmers develop record-keeping plans to help keep them in line with FDA food safety guidelines. Cory McCue of Woodland Gardens in Winterville, Georgia, makes notes about the farm's July harvest in the packinghouse while Christine White packs shishito peppers into 10-pound bags. CAES News
Produce Safety
Over the past decade, Americans have fallen in love with locally grown produce, but just because something is grown nearby doesn’t automatically make it safe.