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According to Georgia Organics, “Land Steward award winners not only foster a better environment through the soil, but through their larger community through leadership, education, and outreach.” CAES News
Land Steward Award
For nearly three decades, Juan Carlos Díaz-Pérez has been contributing to the field of sustainable vegetable production, focusing on organic agriculture as a professor in the University of Georgia Department of Horticulture. This month, Georgia Organics is recognizing his work with the 2022 Land Steward Award.
UGA horticulture Professor Marc van Iersel's research focuses on developing sustainable and cost-effective ways to ensure that crops — such as these turnip plants in a grow room at his greenhouses — get the amount of light they need to grow. CAES News
In Control
Next time you sit down to a crisp, green salad take a little time to think about where your leafy greens come from. Traditional agriculture is highly weather dependent, and many producers of high-value crops are shifting over from field production to controlled environment agriculture.
Tomatoes, in varying stages of ripeness, growing on a tomato plant. CAES News
Fruit or Veggie
From an early age, we’re told by our parents to make sure we eat our vegetables. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends that people eat five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables per day. However, there’s long been confusion around what is a vegetable versus a fruit. So, when is a vegetable actually a fruit — or a root or a shoot?
Symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings. Brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale, are all susceptible to this plant disease. CAES News
Alternaria blight and head rot
A new multistate project will bring together researchers from the University of Georgia and partner universities to fight Alternaria leaf blight and head rot in broccoli, a plant disease that thrives in warm temperatures and humidity.
UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's Professor Marc van Iersel, right, is leading an interdisciplinary team which hopes to integrate new lighting technologies, big data and better growing practices to reduce energy costs in greenhouses and plant factories. CAES News
Start-up
The illuminated light bulb. It’s the symbol of a great idea come to life.
Angelos Deltsidis, who is originally from Greece, earned his doctoral degree at the University of Florida. In his new position at UGA, he'll show how commodities thrive under different storage conditions, temperatures and atmospheres. CAES News
Postharvest Specialist
The newest crop specialist on the University of Georgia Tifton campus hopes to help Georgia fruit and vegetable farmers extend the shelf life of their produce after harvest.
Whiteflies transmit several devastating viruses to important vegetable crops, including squash. CAES News
Whitefly Management
Researchers from three research institutions are using a $3.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fight whiteflies on vegetable crops.
In addition to produce safety procedures, UGA Extension helps farmers develop record-keeping plans to help keep them in line with FDA food safety guidelines. Cory McCue of Woodland Gardens in Winterville, Georgia, makes notes about the farm's July harvest in the packinghouse while Christine White packs shishito peppers into 10-pound bags. CAES News
Produce Safety
Over the past decade, Americans have fallen in love with locally grown produce, but just because something is grown nearby doesn’t automatically make it safe.
Horticulture Professor Esther van der Knapp of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences worked with a team of geneticists around the world to create a fuller inventory of the genetic diversity of the tomato. They release a pangenome for the tomato in the May edition of Nature Genetics. (photos by Merritt Melancon) CAES News
Tomato Pan-genome
 It’s summer, and Georgia gardeners are anxiously awaiting their first tomato harvest. Just in time for those first tomato sandwiches, researchers at the University of Georgia have helped unlock the mystery of what separates today’s tomatoes from their inedible ancestors.
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Cabbage
As temperatures increase this spring, Georgia cabbage farmers should scout their crops regularly to ensure disease pressure is not too high, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.