Browse Commercial Vegetables Stories - Page 11

146 results found for Commercial Vegetables
Green beans grow up a trellis in a Spalding County, Ga., garden. CAES News
Small gardens
Often people with limited or no acreage forgo planting a vegetable garden. This need not be the case, since many vegetable varieties can be planted in small spaces. Using proper cultural practices can also reduce the amount of space you need to grow your own vegetables.
A fistful of rich soil from the University of Georgia's J. Phil Campbell Sr. Research and Education Center in Watkinsville, Ga. CAES News
Soil testing is essential
The key to growing prize produce isn’t buying the highest quality transplants, sowing seeds on Good Friday or planting by the signs of the moon. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say the secret’s in the soil.
Onlookers watch as an Air Robot 100B, an unmanned device, is demonstrated Thursday afternoon at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus Conference Center. The demonstration was part of a two-day AUVSI Atlanta Chapter Unmanned Systems in Agriculture Conference. The Air Robot 100B, which is equipped with a video camera, is controlled by David Price (with controller), a senior research technologist at Georgia Tech. It is is designed to aid the military, police or fire department, by reaching a certain height and looking down on something. CAES News
Agricultural technology
Remote-controlled helicopters, unmanned aircraft equipped with imaging sensors; welcome to the future of agriculture.
Farmers and members of the general public met in Macon on March 20 to view a listening session in Atlanta on the proposed new food safety act. Lee Lancaster, senior compliance specialist with the Georgia Department of Agriculture, is shown explaining how to submit comments to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. CAES News
Food safety act
Concerned Georgia farmers gathered in Atlanta, Macon and Tifton on Wednesday, March 20 to hear a summary of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s new Food Safety Modernization Act. Proposed by Congress, the act was developed in an effort to improve the safety of the nation’s food supply.
A pair of beets plants are shown on the Lang Farm in Tifton, Ga. CAES News
Beets for biofuels
Beets are producing “sweet” results with researchers at the University of Georgia.
Green tomatoes infected with Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus. CAES News
Fighting TSWV
Once a major threat to the tomato industry, the thrips-vectored tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has been unable to penetrate the vegetable’s latest line of defense — resistant cultivars.
Student working at UGA's organic demonstration farm at the Durham Horticulture Farm, at 1221 Hog Mountain Road in Watkinsville. CAES News
Sustainable ag workshops
Wondering how to start a successful, small-herd cattle operation? Want to learn how to defeat the hornworms that attacked your tomatoes last year? Or are you worried about finding customers for this year’s bumper crop of cucumbers?
Collard greens grow in a garden in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Spotted greens
Growing and eating collards, turnips and other greens are a Southern tradition. But home gardeners often complain of spots on the leaves of homegrown greens.
Students work in a raised bed garden at High Shoals Elementary School as part of the school's community supported agriculture fundraising project. CAES News
Farm to School month
With the majority of American children at least two generations removed from the farm, it is common for them to think their food originates at the grocery store. Or even worse, they may think it comes from a fast food restaurant. The Farm to School program was established to help battle this misperception and to help children connect and appreciate the food they eat.
A vegetable garden in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Garden clean-up
Many home gardeners are already planning for 2013’s garden, but the 2012 garden season has one more chore in store for you. Taking the time to clean out your old garden now can save you a lot of heartache, disease and insect problems next spring.