Browse Commercial Vegetables Stories - Page 6

146 results found for Commercial Vegetables
Tim Coolong, UGA vegetable horticulturist, looks for squash in a plot on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Squash Research
A University of Georgia vegetable horticulturist is searching for new squash varieties to help Georgia farmers improve the state’s $24.7 million squash industry.
Kale is being researched on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Georgia Kale
A “green superfood” is making its way into the mainstream and into the fields of southwest Georgia farms, according to a University of Georgia vegetable expert. Increased consumer demand in connection with its many health benefits has Georgia farmers planting, and selling, more of the leafy green.
Fresh vegetables grown organically by an Elijay, Ga., farmer CAES News
Community of Opportunity
University of Georgia Extension is connecting vegetable farmers and impoverished families in Dougherty County, Georgia. The desired results are improved eating habits for this southwest Georgia community and a new market for producers.
Collard greens grow in a garden in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Collard Boom
Add this to the list of things that Georgians already knew. Collards are good for us, and go with just about anything.
Pictured is a tent-like structure used as shading for bell pepper research on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Bell Pepper Shading
University of Georgia horticulturist Juan Carlos Diaz-Perez has found that covering bell peppers with shading nets increases yields, extends the growing season and makes for more attractive fruit.
Fusarium wilt, a deadly fungal disease that lives in the soil, attacks a watermelon vine in a field in Berrien County. CAES News
Fusarium Wilt
Fusarium wilt reduces watermelon yields in Georgia fields. A University of Georgia Extension agent in one of the state’s most prolific watermelon-producing counties is searching for a way to help save the melons and the farmers’ profits.
A cowpea curculio on Southern pea. CAES News
Cowpea Curculio
Southerners love crowder, purple hull and black-eyed peas; so do cowpea curculios, a weevil that feeds on Southern peas. University of Georgia researchers in Tifton are working to eliminate this pest, which causes substantial yield losses to Southern peas grown in south Georgia.
A new grant-funded collaboration between the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Fort Valley State University, AgSouth Farm Credit and Georgia Organics will provide training to beginning farmers in Georgia to help them build their farms into sustainable and profitable businesses. CAES News
Beginning Farmers
Starting in October, a new training program will offer beginning and young farmers crash courses in business planning, vegetable and fruit production and goat husbandry to provide them with a strong foundation to help grow their new businesses.
CAES News
Tropical Storms
Tropical storms may cause havoc for coastal homeowners, but the rainfall they bring recharges the water balance and keeps soil moist in the summer, according to University of Georgia climatologist Pam Knox. Lack of tropical storm activity in 2014 contributed to Georgia’s prolonged drought, she said.
Beau Lamb tosses a watermelon into a truck, as Robert Ames writes down its weight while working at the UGA Tifton Campus. The two student workers work for vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong. CAES News
Watermelon Variety Testing
Research by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences could help Georgia’s watermelon growers produce sweeter results.