Browse Beef Stories - Page 5

81 results found for Beef
Although there is no one-size-fits-all rule to rotational grazing management, to provide forage rest and recovery and improve grazing efficiency, the first step is to get cattle moving. CAES News
Water for Cattle
Just like humans, livestock are negatively impacted by poor water quality. Cattle that drink poor-quality water will drink less water and have a diminished feed intake, resulting in reduced average daily gains and return on investment.
Here is a picture of poor forage quality. CAES News
Forage Quality
High quality forage is essential to beef cattle’s nutrition and beef producers’ bottom lines, said University of Georgia Extension forage specialist Dennis Hancock. Focusing on forage quality helps farmers keep overall costs low, he said.
Beef cattle graze in a pasture at the University of Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Ga. CAES News
Beef Cattle Update
Georgia cattle farmers, with both large- and small-scale operations, will learn useful, research-based information at the annual University of Georgia Mountain Beef Cattle Field Day Thursday, April 16 in Blairsville, Georgia.
Beef cattle graze in a pasture at the University of Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Ga. CAES News
Double Crop Baleage
University of Georgia Extension agent Mark Frye helps save Georgia cattlemen money while providing cattle a better diet.
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015. CAES News
Ag Forecast
One of the state’s leading counties in row crop production received bleak news about commodity prices during a 2015 Georgia Ag Forecast event held Thursday, Jan. 22.
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015. CAES News
Ag Forecast: Peanuts
University of Georgia agricultural experts will give a forecast of agriculture in the coming year at a series of events set across the state in January. The new year looks bright for Georgia livestock producers, but not for many row crop farmers.
Ryan Crowe debones a chuck at the University of Georgia Meat Science Technology Center on the campus in Athens. Students learn all about meat processing, from harvest to the table, and the public can purchase high quality meats. CAES News
Meat Store
A fully functional harvesting and processing facility, the University of Georgia Meat Science Technology Center is used to facilitate teaching, research and outreach at the university while harvesting and processing 100-140 cattle, 240 hogs and 30 sheep annually.
Green acorns lie beneath a tree on the University of Georgia campus in Tifton, Ga. Many species of wildlife can eat acorns with no ill effects, but cows can contract acorn poisoning from eating too many - especially the green ones. CAES News
No green acorns
Squirrels, birds and small wildlife are known to dine on acorns. Cows, on the other hand, can eat a few acorns, but too many can cause deadly acorn—or “Quercus”—poisoning.
Ross Oglesby works on a seal for the Sunbelt Expo Spotlight State Building. CAES News
Sunbelt Seals
A graduate of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is etched into Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition history.
A barrel racing competitor leans her horse into the turn during the Great Southland Stampede Rodeo. CAES News
Rodeo Time
The University of Georgia's Block and Bridle Club is gearing up for the 40th annual Great Southland Stampede Rodeo, which will roll into Athens April 10-12 at the UGA Livestock Instructional Arena, 2600 South Milledge Ave.