Browse Natural Disasters Stories - Page 3

43 results found for Natural Disasters
Displaced cattle seek higher ground during Hurricane Harvey in Brazoria County, Texas. Livestock will seek higher ground during flooding, but unfortunately, farmers can't relocate their crops. CAES News
Prepare & Evacuate
If a mandatory evacuation is declared in your area, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent Tim Davis says residents should prepare to be away from home for a few weeks.
Corn plants are surrounded by water in a field in Kansas in 2014. Heavy rains leave farmers with no way to get in their fields to tend or harvest their crops. CAES News
Wet soil
Rainfall from Hurricane Matthew has left soil in coastal south Georgia completely saturated. Rainy conditions like these wreak havoc on gardeners and farmers who need to do yard or field work. In many cases, the best way to deal with the situation is to wait for drier conditions.
The horticultural crew at the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens resets a Carolina Sapphire cypress tree following a hurricane. CAES News
Storm Damage
When rebuilding your landscape after storm damage, do it in small, concentrated outdoor rooms or pockets, one area at a time. This method will help homeowners from getting overwhelmed. What took a few hours to bring down may take weeks to clean up.
CAES News
Hotter than Normal
Summer began in Georgia with warmer than normal temperatures throughout the state and shows no signs of relenting before fall.
Southern Regional Extension Forestry (SREF), in collaboration with eXtension, an online learning resource for Cooperative Extension System professionals, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have launched the Climate Learning Network (CLN) website — a clearinghouse for the most up-to-date climate information for farmers, homeowners, natural resources professionals and Extension personnel. CAES News
Climate Learning Network
Southern Regional Extension Forestry (SREF), in collaboration with eXtension, an online learning resource for Cooperative Extension System professionals, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have launched the Climate Learning Network (CLN) website, climatelearning.net, as a clearinghouse for the most up-to-date information for farmers, homeowners, natural resources professionals and Extension personnel.
March saw temperatures that were 3 to 6 degrees above normal through out the state. CAES News
March Climate
March was drier and warmer than normal across Georgia, ushering in projections for a warmer and wetter than normal spring.
Although January was drier than normal across the state, some areas of Georgia, specifically Atlanta and Alma, received more rain than normal. CAES News
January Climate
After a record-setting warm December 2015, January 2016 in Georgia was slightly cooler and drier than normal. While El Niño conditions mean a continuation of slightly cooler-than-normal conditions in February, it should also mean a wetter-than-normal month.
December 2015 was much warmer than normal across the southeastern United States. CAES News
December 2015
2015 saw one of the warmest Decembers since Georgians started keeping records, and the month was also much wetter than normal. The warm, wet conditions created havoc for Georgia farmers.
UGA Extension has researched-based resources for those who want to raise backyard chickens. CAES News
Avian Influenza
The current highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 outbreak in the United States is a concern for the commercial poultry industry, not the general population, says a University of Georgia poultry expert. Humans won’t be infected with avian influenza by eating chicken or other poultry products. Nearly all previous cases of human infections with other avian influenza viruses involved close, direct contact with infected poultry, but little to no direct transmission from person to person. While the HPAI H5 virus has caused some severe devastation for the U.S. commercial poultry industry, there have been no reports of infections in humans, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers the risk to people from this virus to be low.
CAES News
Weather Radio and More
For decades families have relied on NOAA weather radios to alert them to hazardous weather conditions near their homes. Updates in technology now give the public options for staying abreast of weather conditions while on the go.