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13 results found for Brain Development
Lohitash Karumbaiah at work in his lab. (Photo by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA) CAES News
Brain Glue
At a cost of $38 billion a year, an estimated 5.3 million people are living with a permanent disability related to traumatic brain injury in the United States today, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The physical, mental and financial toll of a TBI can be enormous, but new research from the University of Georgia provides promise. 
The Shanghai skyline is often clouded with smog from industrial air pollution. CAES News
Pollution Affects Adolescent Development
The toll that air pollution takes on a person’s physical health is well documented. But new University of Georgia research suggests there could be another price too: a child’s drive to be successful.
Cutler, honored with the Georgia 4-H Green Jacket Award, gives an acceptance speech at the 2020 Stars Across Georgia virtual awards ceremony. CAES News
4-H annual awards
Gale Cutler, a senior public relations coordinator at the Georgia Electric Membership Corporation (EMC), has been named the 2020 recipient of the prestigious Georgia 4-H Green Jacket Award. In addition to Cutler’s role at Georgia EMC, she is an integral member of the Georgia 4-H Advisory Committee.
Murray County 4-H Tech Changemakers gather for a photo before an informational session in 2019. CAES News
4-H Tech Changemakers
With increased electronic communication leaving many members of older generations behind, a partnership between the Microsoft Corporation and the National 4-H Council has mobilized an energized group of 4-H Technology Changemakers to help provide resources and training to level the playing field.
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology. With this potential new technique, RBC researchers, including Steve Stice (left) and Lohitash Karumbaiah (right), hope to boost the brain’s natural ability to recover and provide physicians with a treatment that can be administered immediately in cases of severe TBI. CAES News
“Cargo” Molecules
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes — “cargo” molecules within the nervous system that carry messages to the brain — can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology.
Forty-six people presented posters at the RBC Symposium held Friday, April 26. RBC Symposium Judge Simon Platt, BVM&S, a UGA professor of veterinary neurology, is shown with RBC poster presenter Katherine Watkins of the Easley Lab. View more images at https://adobe.ly/2vBPsxf. CAES News
Student Researchers
The 5th annual Regenerative Bioscience Center Fellows Symposium drew more than 54 student participants. The gathering generally focused around the center’s core research projects of stroke, neurological injury, and orthopedic conditions. The 2019 event, titled Climb Higher, included students in the CAES Animal and Dairy Science program.
University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical scientists have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain's natural healing tendencies in animal models. Led by UGA Professor Steven Stice and Nasrul Hoda of Augusta University, the team created a treatment called AB126 using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells. The tiny tubular shape of an exosome allows EV therapy to cross barriers cells cannot. The exosomes, shown in the photo as small, red punctate clusters, are taken up by neurons, shown as green cell extensions surrounding a blue nucleus. CAES News
Stroke Treatment
A team of researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical, a UGA startup company, have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain’s natural healing tendencies in animal models.
Associate Professor Franklin West (left) and Emily Baker working with induced pluripotent stem cells generated from a patient's own somatic cells. CAES News
New Stroke Model
It is well-known in the medical field that the pig brain shares certain physiological and anatomical similarities with the human brain. So similar are the two that researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have developed the first U.S. pig model for stroke treatments...
The picture represents the sustained presence of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) within the 'Brain Glue' construct four weeks after a severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), according to University of Georgia scientist Lohitash Karumbaiah who led the team that designed and created Brain Glue. The construct laden with labeled NSCs was delivered directly into the lesion 48 hours post-TBI. CAES News
'Brain Glue'
Researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have developed Brain Glue, a substance that could one day serve as a treatment for traumatic brain injuries, or TBIs. 
This photo represents pseudo-colored MRI T1 maps of a Zika-infected chicken embryo. The embryo was infected with the Zika virus at a time associated with the first trimester of a human pregnancy. The photo captures a well-developed chicken embryo within the egg, and lesion within the brain, attributed to the Zika virus infection. CAES News
Zika Virus Research
A University of Georgia graduate student is using early stage chicken embryos to monitor the progression of the Zika virus. By collecting data on how the virus affects brain development, researchers at UGA can pinpoint the best treatments to stop or slow the progression of early-stage microcephaly, a rare birth defect linked to the Zika virus.