Browse Controlling and Preventing Disease Stories

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Professor Steven Stice says the new drug could be a game changer for chronic inflammation-based diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. (Photo by Peter Frey) CAES News
Stroke Treatment
A new therapeutic for stroke based on University of Georgia research will soon enter clinical trials. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared the new drug, known as AB126, to enter a Phase 1b/2a clinical trial, which is expected to begin in the first half of 2024 and will require significant funds to complete. This is the first stage of the trial and will test the safety and efficacy of the therapeutic in ischemic stroke patients.
UGA virologist Malak Esseili (left) and graduate student Julianna Morris studied methods of inactivating SARS-CoV-2 on contaminated surfaces. CAES News
Testing Sanitizers
When the coronavirus pandemic first began in 2020, there was much that officials did not know about the virus and how to combat it. One area of concern was how to disinfect surfaces that were contaminated with SARS-CoV-2. Institutions such as schools and daycares especially needed to know how to clean high-touch surfaces to reduce the risk of infection.
Kissing Bug Starved and Engorged CAES News
Faculty Award Winner
Kevin Vogel, an assistant professor in the Department of Entomology at the University of Georgia, has received a prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program award from the National Science Foundation. Supported by the more than $1 million CAREER grant, Vogel and his team will spend the next five years building upon the still-limited body of research regarding the symbiotic relationship between kissing bugs and a highly specified bacterium that resides in their gut.
More than 6.5 million Americans today are living with Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is expected to double in the next 30 years. With this in mind, the UGA College of Public Health has created the Cognitive Aging Research and Education Center to help assist any Georgia resident developing Alzheimer’s disease or dementia and provide them with the care and support they need. (Photo by Chancey Phillips) CAES News
UGA Extension Alzheimers Care
At the same time they were building clinical capacity, the University of Georgia's CARE team was developing a curriculum to educate communities and health care providers about Alzheimer’s and dementia prevention and the need for diagnosis. To help get that curriculum in front of rural communities and providers, they turned to experts at UGA Cooperative Extension.
Through the Rural Georgia: Growing Stronger initiative, the annual Farm Stress Summit and the Georgia Agriculture Wellness Alliance, UGA Extension is expanding its work to improve rural stress and mental health to serve the 1.5 million Georgians who live and work in rural communities. (Photo by Andrew Tucker, Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA) CAES News
Rural Health
More than 60 million Americans and 1.5 million Georgians live and work in rural communities and value being members of small communities, but access to health care and treatment is challenging in areas where doctors and hospitals can be far from home.
Honeybee research CAES News
Honey Bee Vaccine
Vaccines are a proven benefit in the world of animal science. Producers have vaccinated livestock and pet owners have vaccinated dogs and cats for decades. Soon beekeepers may be able to protect their colonies through vaccination. The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Dalan Animal Health have teamed up to advance the world’s first honey bee vaccine.
Entomology Assistant Professor Kevin Vogel, doctoral student Carissa Gilliland, undergraduate student Ashley Dombrowski and doctoral student Nia Keyes-Scott look at a kissing bug in the lab. (Submitted photo) CAES News
Chagas Disease
A kiss has such romantic appeal, yet some kisses just end in heartbreak. A smooch from the Rhodnius prolixus, or the blood-sucking “kissing bug,” could be characterized more like the kiss of death — the insect is a primary vector for Chagas disease, a parasitic infection that kills more than 10,000 people annually around the globe. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, victims with chronic cases of Chagas can suffer from life-threatening heart or digestive malfunctions.
Jayden Mulamoottil, a fourth-grade student at Barrow Elementary in Athens-Clarke County, placed first in Georgia's radon poster contest with an illustration imploring Georgians to check their homes for radon gas. CAES News
Radon Action Month
January is National Radon Action month, and each year University of Georgia Cooperative Extension sponsors a poster contest for students across the state to help bring awareness to the importance of radon testing.
kassem lab large (1) CAES News
Antimicrobial Resistance
A gene that causes bacteria to be resistant to one of the world’s most important antibiotics, colistin, has been detected in sewer water in Georgia. The presence of the MCR-9 gene is a major concern for public health because it causes antimicrobial resistance, a problem that the World Health Organization has declared “one of the top 10 global public health threats facing humanity.”
UGA Extension offers programs and guidance for people of all ages to improve their nutrition and live their best lives. CAES News
New Year's Resolutions
As the new year approaches, many people discover a renewed enthusiasm for self-care and self-improvement. Georgia residents looking for guidance on matters of health, healthy relationships, financial literacy and more can count on University of Georgia Cooperative Extension for a wealth of resources to help reach those goals.