Browse Environment Stories - Page 10

501 results found for Environment
Peaches hang from a Georgia tree in this 2009 file photo. CAES News
Peach Crop
Cooler temperatures are needed this winter to avoid another disastrous peach season, according to Jeff Cook, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension County coordinator in Taylor and Peach counties. 
Pecans being researched on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. CAES News
Pecan Harvest
Tropical Storm Irma broke pecan tree limbs, knocked trees down and blew nuts off the trees and out of their shucks when it moved through Georgia in early September, yet University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells is still optimistic about this year’s crop. He estimates yields ranging from 85 to 100 million pounds.
Chainsaw trainings are being held across Georgia. CAES News
Safety Training
Using grant funds from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the University of Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture has developed safety training for green industry employees. To date, these programs have reached more than 4,000 workers.
Sandbags work to keep the sea at bay in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. University of Georgia scientist Craig Landry says there are places along the coast that are so at risk of eroding that they are pushed to embrace a "phased retreat."  Tourists could stop coming because of beach erosion and homeowners would sell because they can't afford insurance, or they are worried about losing their investment, he said. CAES News
Coastal Study
University of Georgia natural resource economist Craig Landry will use his portion of a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study how the economy and the environment are affected when humans and coastal regions commingle. The four-year project is a team effort with researchers from Colorado, North Carolina and Ohio.
Cotton plants blown over from Tropical Storm Irma's winds on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Cotton Crop
Georgia’s cotton crop sustained at least $100 million in losses following Irma’s trek across the state, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist Jared Whitaker.
As a result of a roof leak, mold grows on the ceiling of a home. CAES News
Fight Mold
Hurricane Irma had slowed down by the time she reached Georgia, reducing the amount of expected structural damage to homes, but flood waters may have left behind a sneaky and dangerous after-effect: mold.
Winds from Tropical Storm Irma uprooted a tree on the lawn of the United Bank in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Downed Trees
Tropical Storm Irma blew powerful winds of up to 70 mph when she hit Georgia, providing homeowners, tree removal services and insurance companies plenty of work to do. Examining storm-damaged trees can provide insight into why some trees "fail" during windstorms.
Pecans being researched on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. CAES News
Pecan Crop
The Southeast is in Hurricane Irma’s crosshairs, and Georgia pecan farmers are bracing for the hurricane’s potential impact on this year’s crop.
Displaced cattle seek higher ground during Hurricane Harvey in Brazoria County, Texas. Livestock will seek higher ground during flooding, but unfortunately, farmers can't relocate their crops. CAES News
Prepare & Evacuate
If a mandatory evacuation is declared in your area, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent Tim Davis says residents should prepare to be away from home for a few weeks.
High winds uprooted a large oak tree on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Hurricane Preparedness
Hurricane Irma strengthened to a Category 5 storm with sustained winds of 175 mph as of Monday, Sept. 5. It’s moving west-northwest on its present track, but longer-term models project that it will make a sharp turn to the north later this week, which could threaten parts of the Southeast, including Georgia.