Browse Environment Stories - Page 11

502 results found for Environment
High winds uprooted a large oak tree on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Hurricane Preparedness
Hurricane Irma strengthened to a Category 5 storm with sustained winds of 175 mph as of Monday, Sept. 5. It’s moving west-northwest on its present track, but longer-term models project that it will make a sharp turn to the north later this week, which could threaten parts of the Southeast, including Georgia.
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply. CAES News
Upper Floridan Aquifer
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply.
An Asian longhorned beetle chews through wood. CAES News
Invasive Species
Over the next 10 years, the number of cargo containers operating out of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, is expected to double. While additional cargo means increased revenue for the state, Chuck Bargeron, associate director of the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, is concerned it could also lead to the establishment of more invasive species.
Rainfall in Georgia during April was highly varied. Some southern parts of the state received 2-3 inches less rain than normal, while parts of north Georgia received as many as 4 inches above normal. CAES News
Record Highs
April brought plentiful spring showers to north Georgia but little rainfall to the southern half of the state, resulting in moderate drought conditions, delayed planting, and conditions conducive to wildfires near the Okefenokee Swamp.
Pesticide use is critical in controlling pests like thrips, whiteflies, aphids and beet armyworms. CAES News
Drift complaints
As a result of two years of aggressive training to improve on-target agricultural pesticide applications, the number of pesticide drift complaints received by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has gone down 65 percent, according to UGA Extension weed specialist Stanley Culpepper.
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes. CAES News
Prevent Freeze Damage
Knowing wet bulb temperature could help farmers protect crops from hard freezes while saving money, water and energy.
Healthy peanuts compared to peanuts infected with white mold disease. CAES News
La Nina Weather Pattern
A La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.
A damaged irrigation pivot in Thomas County, Georgia. Credit: Jim Rayburn CAES News
Storm Damage
Deadly storms that ravaged much of south Georgia Jan. 20-22 also damaged or destroyed many irrigation pivots that supply needed water to agricultural crops.
Alpharetta Elementary 4th graders from left Joey Santoro, 10, and Neal Seaman, 10, search a stream for life during environmental education at Washega 4H camp in Dahlonega, Thursday, April 28, 2005. CAES News
Environmental Education Certificate
UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources are launching an environmental education certificate program this fall.
This 2015 photo shows sunburnt watermelons in a Tift County field. Watermelons can get sunburn if the vines aren't receiving enough water, which leads to wilting that makes fruit vulnerable to sun exposure. CAES News
Watermelon Vine Protection
Whether protecting watermelons from the scalding summer sun or helping plants produce bigger fruit, maintaining healthy vines is a top priority for Georgia growers, especially when farm workers continuously pick from the same fruit bed.