Browse Environment Stories - Page 11

517 results found for Environment
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season. CAES News
Peanut Planting Time
Now is the peak time to plant peanuts in Georgia, according to Cristiane Pilon, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut physiologist.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say removing your shoes before going indoors can reduce the amount of pollen you track into your home. Other ways to reduce the amount of pollen indoors include wiping your pets' paws before allowing them to come inside and cleaning floors and surfaces often. CAES News
Indoor Pollen
Are your sinuses clogged? Do you feel like you are walking in a sea of yellow dust? Have you washed your car three times this week? Welcome to pollen season in Georgia.
Corn planted at the Bellflower Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in this March 30 photo. CAES News
Planting Conditions
Georgia farmers should expect dry weather when they plant their crops this spring, but Pam Knox, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences agricultural climatologist, anticipates an active tropical storm season in the Atlantic Ocean this summer.
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees. CAES News
Agroforestry & Wildlife
Pine straw production, timber sales and wildlife management will top the list of topics at the Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day slated for Thursday, Sept. 20, at the University of Georgia’s Westbrook Research Farm in Griffin, Georgia.
When yards are flooded, residential well safety is of paramount importance. Cities and counties alert citizens with boil advisories when municipal water supplies are affected, but those who rely on wells for water have to monitor their water themselves. Wells that have been overtopped by flood waters need to flushed and tested for bacteria because of the potential danger of contaminants being washed into the well. CAES News
'Funny' Water
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents often get calls from homeowners who are concerned about the quality of their well water. Water from municipal sources is routinely monitored for safety, but water from private wells isn’t.
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017. CAES News
Georgia's Peanut Crop
Georgia’s dryland peanut crop excelled this year, while irrigated fields lacked in comparison to past years, said University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort. The result is a crop estimated to average 4,400 pounds per acre.
Peaches hang from a Georgia tree in this 2009 file photo. CAES News
Peach Crop
Cooler temperatures are needed this winter to avoid another disastrous peach season, according to Jeff Cook, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension County coordinator in Taylor and Peach counties. 
Pecans being researched on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. CAES News
Pecan Harvest
Tropical Storm Irma broke pecan tree limbs, knocked trees down and blew nuts off the trees and out of their shucks when it moved through Georgia in early September, yet University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells is still optimistic about this year’s crop. He estimates yields ranging from 85 to 100 million pounds.
Chainsaw trainings are being held across Georgia. CAES News
Safety Training
Using grant funds from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the University of Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture has developed safety training for green industry employees. To date, these programs have reached more than 4,000 workers.
Sandbags work to keep the sea at bay in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. University of Georgia scientist Craig Landry says there are places along the coast that are so at risk of eroding that they are pushed to embrace a "phased retreat."  Tourists could stop coming because of beach erosion and homeowners would sell because they can't afford insurance, or they are worried about losing their investment, he said. CAES News
Coastal Study
University of Georgia natural resource economist Craig Landry will use his portion of a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study how the economy and the environment are affected when humans and coastal regions commingle. The four-year project is a team effort with researchers from Colorado, North Carolina and Ohio.