Browse Environment Stories - Page 18

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Iron bacteria residue occurs where an area of water becomes exposed to oxygen. The iron bacteria use the oxygen in this zone to convert ferrous iron into ferric iron. As a result, the iron changes into a rusty, red precipitate. This material can also appear as a fluffy or filamentous, organic material as a result of the bacteria growing. CAES News
Iron Bacteria
The smell of foul odors as well as the sight of brown or red, slimy substances or an oily sheen on the surface of streams and wetlands has some people concerned about water quality. Solid, rust-colored particles are actually a naturally occurring result of iron bacteria. It doesn't pose any human health risks, but the red, slimy sludge can clog pipes and pumps when using well water.
Overwintering kudzu bugs discovered in pine bark. CAES News
Kudzu Bug Decline
Once a nuisance for soybean farmers in the Southeast, kudzu bug populations appear to be declining in the U.S. The decline began in 2014 and is believed to have been brought on by two of the kudzu bug’s natural predators: a fungus and a wasp.
March saw temperatures that were 3 to 6 degrees above normal through out the state. CAES News
March Climate
March was drier and warmer than normal across Georgia, ushering in projections for a warmer and wetter than normal spring.
Today's washing machines are a far cry from the one Grandma used. With all the bells, whistles and options, buying a new washing machine, or dryer, can feel like new car shopping. CAES News
Washing Machines
Thanks to technology and manufacturers’ attempts to please the ever-demanding consumer, washing machines have become more “intelligent” and able to detect soil levels and water needs. Before buying a new one, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension home experts suggest asking yourself a few very important questions.
Ann M. Steensland, deputy director for the Global Harvest Initiative, will deliver the keynote address at this year's Sixth Annual International Agriculture Day Reception. The event will be held from 3:30-5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 19, at the Georgia Museum of Art. CAES News
Food Security in Focus
Ann M. Steensland, deputy director for the Global Harvest Initiative, will deliver the keynote address at this year’s Sixth Annual International Agriculture Day reception. The event will be held from 3:30-5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 19, at the Georgia Museum of Art. Hosted by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Global Programs, the talk and reception are free and open to the public.
A photo of a car windshield covered with yellow pine pollen. CAES News
Pollen Counts
The dusty pollen that we see in the air is not the pollen that plagues allergy sufferers. However, oftentimes when we can see lots of pine pollen floating in the air, pollen counts for problem plants are often high as well.
A deer dines on pasture grass in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Dining deer
When deer leave the shelter of the woods in search of food, they often inspect the shrubs and flowers in your front yard’s landscape as if they were browsing a buffet.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension wildlife expert Michael Mengak tells visitors to a field day how a squirrel trap should be used. CAES News
Critter control
Chewing pests have many Georgia homeowners wondering “Who dunnit?” when their favorite tree or shrub is scarred by teeth marks.
Fictional Peter Rabbit isn't the only rabbit that enjoys munching in vegetable gardens. To keep rabbits out of home gardens, University of Georgia Extension specialists recommend building a fence around precious plants. The fence must be at least 2-feet high and the bottom must be buried at least 3-inches deep. CAES News
Rabbit Control
While rabbits may seem cute and fuzzy, the common rabbit or eastern cottontail can do considerable damage to flowers, vegetables, trees and shrubs any time of the year in places ranging from suburban yards to rural fields and tree plantations.
Abnormally dry conditions this summer have kept Georgia's mosquito populations mercifully low, but that's no reason for Georgians to let down their guard, especially this season. CAES News
Mosquito Season
With warmer temperatures around the corner, Georgia’s mosquito season won’t be far behind. This year the remote chance of a southeastern U.S. outbreak of Zika — a mosquito-borne virus now prevalent in parts of South America — has university and public health officials doubling down on their message of how to control the pest.