Browse Environment Stories - Page 2

501 results found for Environment
A brood of decades-old 17-year cicadas that have been perfectly preserved. CAES News
Brood X
It has been 17 years since a set of billions of periodical cicadas emerged from their underground chambers and filled the air with boisterous buzzing and desperate mating calls.
Boxwood blight symptoms clockwise from upper left: tan to gray leaf lesions with a darker purplish border on an English boxwood; circular, tan spots with a brown border on upper leaves; tan blighted leaves and bare stems on an infected plant; blackening of stems and browning foliage; and black stem lesions on bare branch tips. (photos by Jean Williams-Woodward) CAES News
Landscape Plant Diseases
If you're seeing brown areas in your landscape trees or hedges where you should be seeing green, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension can help. Wet winters and severe weather have been causing disease and other issues in landscape plants, especially Leyland cypress and boxwood.
A skipper butterfly at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia. (photo by Olivia Smith/UGA) CAES News
Butterfly Abundance
Climate is likely the biggest driver of butterfly abundance change, according to a new study by University of Georgia entomologists.
Camden County Agriculture and Natural Resources agent Jessica Warren (pictured) worked with Martin Wunderly, area water agent for UGA Extension’s Northeast District, to develop the Georgia Green Landscape Stewards curriculum. CAES News
Green Landscapes
For some residents, a pristinely manicured lawn free of weeds and undisturbed by insects is the ultimate goal. However, a new program from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension encourages creating a more natural landscape that reduces chemical use and incorporates native plants to promote biodiversity and protect the environment.
Critical pesticide application training for pest control professionals and producers will go online for 2020. CAES News
Pesticide trainings stay virtual
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Department of Agriculture are partnering to offer the Using Pesticides Wisely training program in a virtual format again this year.
The Shanghai skyline is often clouded with smog from industrial air pollution. CAES News
Pollution Affects Adolescent Development
The toll that air pollution takes on a person’s physical health is well documented. But new University of Georgia research suggests there could be another price too: a child’s drive to be successful.
Biosecurity expert and plant pathology alumna Ada Bacetty poses with UGA adjunct professor Charles Bacon after her 2008 graduation. (contributed) CAES News
Shattered Ceilings
Speaking at the University of Georgia for the first time since graduating in 2008, U.S. Department of Defense's Ada Bacetty presented the “Shattered Ceilings” seminar to the campus community — an engaging conversation about breaking through barriers in pursuit of diversity and inclusion.
Radon levels in Georgia counties based on data from tests from four radon labs from January 1990 through December 2019. Counties with fewer than 15 radon tests are not included. CAES News
Radon Action Month
As it is every year, January is National Radon Action month. However, this year feels different, as many people are spending more time at home to keep each other safe and healthy. This makes it even more important that we test our homes for radon, a colorless, odorless gas that is the second-leading cause of lung cancer.
Jessica McGuire, with the nonprofit conservation organization Quail Forever, teaches students about wildlife conservation at Shiver Elementary School, where Grady County 4-H'ers planted a pollinator garden to help students understand the importance of protecting ecosystems. CAES News
Preserving Pollinators
Eight Grady County 4-H’ers installed a pollinator garden at a local school as part of a yearlong program highlighting the importance of pollinators.
A supergene is a collection of neighboring genes located on a chromosome that are inherited together due to close genetic linkage. Studying these unique genes is important to understanding the potential causes for differences among the social structure of fire ants, specifically for controlling the species and building upon the existing knowledge base. CAES News
Fire ant supergene
A unique study conducted by University of Georgia entomologists led to the discovery of a distinctive supergene in fire ant colonies that determines whether young queen ants will leave their birth colony to start their own new colony or if they will join one with multiple queens. Researchers also found that ants were more aggressive toward queens who don’t possess the supergene, causing colony workers to kill them. This critical finding opens the door to new pest control methods that may be more efficient in eradicating problematic fire ant colonies.