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To help reduce stress over the holidays, University of Georgia Extension experts say make lists and stick to them, just like these wise youngsters. Make lists of what to buy and where to buy those items and create a list of everything that needs to be done. Then attach a schedule for the coming weeks to break large tasks into smaller ones. CAES News
Reducing Stress
There’s a huge buildup to the winter holidays. With so much happening, we have little time left to take care of ourselves, and physical and emotional resources may become depleted. Some stress can provide motivation to be productive, but too much stress can be detrimental to health and enjoyment of the season. To make this holiday less stressful and more enjoyable, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offers the following tips.
CAES News
Food Gifts
Gifts of food to friends and family are common during the holidays. To help both the gift-giver and the gift-getter keep these foods safe, follow these tips from UGA Extension expert Judy Harrison.
CAES News
Healthy Holidays
While the holidays are often viewed as a time of inevitable weight gain, it’s possible to enjoy some of the same foods while still maintaining a healthy diet.
CAES News
Tame Holiday Stress
For children, there’s hardly a downside to the holidays; toys, treats and time away from school are enough to bring on dreams of sugarplums. For adults, the holidays can conjure a string of mental to-do lists and tension that make those sugarplums feel more like a sugar crash.
UGA Extension has researched-based resources for those who want to raise backyard chickens. CAES News
Avian Influenza
The current highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 outbreak in the United States is a concern for the commercial poultry industry, not the general population, says a University of Georgia poultry expert. Humans won’t be infected with avian influenza by eating chicken or other poultry products. Nearly all previous cases of human infections with other avian influenza viruses involved close, direct contact with infected poultry, but little to no direct transmission from person to person. While the HPAI H5 virus has caused some severe devastation for the U.S. commercial poultry industry, there have been no reports of infections in humans, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers the risk to people from this virus to be low.
UGA food scientist Marilyn Erickson works in her laboratory in the UGA Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Cross-Contamination
In a recent study funded by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, University of Georgia researchers found that produce containing bacteria are likely to contaminate other produce items through the continued use of knives or graters — the bacteria latches onto the utensils commonly found in consumers’ homes and spreads to the next item.
Roxie Price, a family and consumer sciences agent with UGA Extension in Tift County, teaches students at Len Lastinger last year about proper hand-washing techniques. CAES News
Child Development
Children are like sponges—they absorb everything. That’s why University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents are teaching children, at an early age, the importance of decreasing sugar consumption and properly washing their hands.
Christen Jackson, a USDA SNAP-Ed educator with UGA Extension in DeKalb County, prepares a healthy pasta dish as part of a nutrition demonstration at the DeKalb County Mobile Market. CAES News
DeKalb Mobile Market
For residents in some metro Atlanta neighborhoods, it can be impossible to find fresh produce because the closest well-stocked supermarket is geographically out of reach.
University of Georgia Extension specialists say rinse fruits and vegetables well in running water that is safe for drinking before using them. Fruits and vegetables with firm skins or hard rinds can be washed by scrubbing with a clean vegetable brush under running water. CAES News
Safe Harvest
Keeping produce safe means keeping harmful bacteria, viruses and parasites from contaminating fruits and vegetables. Enjoy the rewards of growing food through planning and some practical food safety tips.
A native of Ghana, Maxwell Lamptey is visiting the University of Georgia in the hopes of learning new methods of fighting aflatoxin—a carcinogen produced by soil fungus that can grow on peanuts. Lamprey is working alongside UGA food scientist Jinru Chen on the university's campus in Griffin, Ga. He is studying different methods of solar drying peanuts. CAES News
Killing Aflatoxin
Maxwell Lamptey is visiting America, specifically Griffin, Georgia, in the hopes of learning new methods to fight aflatoxin — a carcinogen produced by soil fungus that can grow on peanuts — in his home country of Ghana.