Browse Health Stories - Page 11

135 results found for Health
The second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. UGA Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon. CAES News
Radon Testing
The University of Georgia Radon Education Program recommends testing your home for radon in recognition of National Radon Action Month in January.
CAES News
Global Programs 2015
Building CAES’s international reputation and a robust global community of support are the main goals of the college’s Office of Global Programs. With a full slate of research, academic and outreach activities and the introduction of a new strategic plan, 2015 has been a banner year for the office.
Food safety researcher Larry Beuchat, a Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Georgia, looks at a petri dish containing salmonella. CAES News
Dangerous Snacks
Researchers at the University of Georgia found that pathogens, like salmonella, can survive for at least six months in cookies and crackers. The recent study was prompted by an increased number of outbreaks of foodborne diseases linked to low-water-activity, or dry, foods.
PRIDE, Parents Reducing Injuries and Driver Error, is one of five programs selected for inclusion in a new national publication highlighting innovative programs that are effective in reducing teen driver crashes. The program, developed by the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences, helps both parents and teenagers develop safe driving habits. CAES News
Traffic Safety Grant
The University of Georgia Traffic Injury Prevention Institute has been awarded a $642,900 grant from the Georgia Governor’s Office of Highway Safety to continue its statewide education programs in the areas of child passenger safety, parent and teen driving safety and senior driver education.
CAES News
Blending Generations
With a little forethought, you can create opportunities for better intergenerational connections this holiday season. What kind of memories do you want to create this season? Consider these tips from a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent.
CAES graduate student Emily Urban, Office of Global Programs Associate Director Vicki McMaken and CAES undergraduate student Erin Burnett. CAES News
Borlaug Dialogue
In the middle of this season of feasting and fêtes, it can sometimes be easy to forget about the plight of people who struggle to have enough to eat. For two University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences students who had the chance to attend the 2015 World Food Prize Borlaug Dialogue this fall, that won’t be the case this year.
To help reduce stress over the holidays, University of Georgia Extension experts say make lists and stick to them, just like these wise youngsters. Make lists of what to buy and where to buy those items and create a list of everything that needs to be done. Then attach a schedule for the coming weeks to break large tasks into smaller ones. CAES News
Reducing Stress
There’s a huge buildup to the winter holidays. With so much happening, we have little time left to take care of ourselves, and physical and emotional resources may become depleted. Some stress can provide motivation to be productive, but too much stress can be detrimental to health and enjoyment of the season. To make this holiday less stressful and more enjoyable, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offers the following tips.
CAES News
Food Gifts
Gifts of food to friends and family are common during the holidays. To help both the gift-giver and the gift-getter keep these foods safe, follow these tips from UGA Extension expert Judy Harrison.
CAES News
Healthy Holidays
While the holidays are often viewed as a time of inevitable weight gain, it’s possible to enjoy some of the same foods while still maintaining a healthy diet.
CAES News
Tame Holiday Stress
For children, there’s hardly a downside to the holidays; toys, treats and time away from school are enough to bring on dreams of sugarplums. For adults, the holidays can conjure a string of mental to-do lists and tension that make those sugarplums feel more like a sugar crash.