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University of Georgia scientist Peggy Ozias-Akins, a College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences professor of horticulture on the UGA Tifton Campus, applies advanced biotechnology and molecular biology tools — tools she developed herself in some cases — to improve crops like peanuts. CAES News
Ozias-Akins Honored
University of Georgia Professor Peggy Ozias-Akins has been awarded the title of Distinguished Research Professor, an honor awarded to UGA faculty recognized internationally for their contributions to knowledge and whose work promises to foster continued creativity in their discipline. She and her colleagues have created new and improved plant varieties that are higher yielding, more disease resistant, more nutritious or have greater ornamental value.
'TifTuf' is pictured growing in front of the Future Farmstead on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Southeastern Turfgrass Conference
The 71st annual Southeastern Turfgrass Conference will be held on Tuesday, May 16, at the Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Georgia.
To avoid thrips damage on peanuts (pictured above), consider the several thrips management options available to peanut growers. CAES News
Monitor Thrips Activity
With thrips activity at a high level, peanut farmers are advised to closely monitor their peanut seedlings as planting season gets underway, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney.
Cristiane Pilon is the new row crop physiologist at the UGA Tifton campus. She will focus much of her research on peanuts. CAES News
Cristiane Pilon
Physiologist Cristiane Pilon is the newest member of the University of Georgia Peanut Team. Her expertise in the physiological processes of the peanut plant and management of the plant’s stress levels will equip Georgia farmers with tools to produce an even better crop.
Dryland peanuts in a field in Georgia in 2014. CAES News
Replanting Peanuts
Georgia peanut farmers who plant a crop in mid-to-late April should make a decision on a second crop within two to four weeks of planting their initial crop. University of Georgia researcher and systems peanut agronomist Scott Tubbs helps farmers make that decision.
Cotton being harvested. CAES News
Cotton Sustainability
A University of Georgia student’s survey of the cotton industry found that the crop, once “king” in Georgia, can compete with synthetic fibers and will continue to be economically and environmentally feasible into the future.
Cotton being harvested. CAES News
Cotton Outlook
Georgia growers can expect to make at least 5 to 6 cents more per pound of cotton than they received this time last year, according to Don Shurley, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton economist.
Joe West (third from left), assistant dean of the UGA Tifton Campus, shakes hands with Tom Stallings, owner of Funston Gin in Funston, Georgia. Stallings donated cotton-harvesting equipment to UGA's C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park (SIRP), which West oversees. Also pictured are SIRP employees (left to right) Ivey Griner, Superintendent Calvin Perry and B.J. Washington. CAES News
Cotton Equipment Donation
A south Georgia cotton gin is helping the University of Georgia’s C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park (SIRP) harvest cotton more efficiently thanks to their donation of a cotton module builder and cotton boll buggy.
Healthy peanuts compared to peanuts infected with white mold disease. CAES News
La Nina Weather Pattern
A La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.
Peng Chee is a cotton breeder on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Cotton Breeding
UGA cotton breeder Peng Chee’s groundbreaking research in molecular genetics provides Georgia cotton farmers with root-knot-nematode-resistant cotton varieties. It has also garnered Chee national recognition.