Browse Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production Stories - Page 3

518 results found for Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production
Peyton Collins of Union County had the prize-winning pumpkin, weighing 548 pounds. CAES News
Georgia 4-H pumpkin-growing contest
More than 25 pumpkins were submitted to Georgia 4-H's 2020 statewide pumpkin-growing contest, with the largest pumpkin, cultivated in north Georgia’s Union County, weighing in at a whopping 548 pounds.
Many of the leaf spot diseases that are apparent on hydrangeas in the fall are actually the result of infections that occurred in the spring. Cercospora leaf spot, pictured here, is a common disease on bigleaf hydrangeas. CAES News
Seeing Spots
With all of the rain that we’ve experienced this year, many fungal leaf spot diseases are active. Hydrangeas are particularly susceptible to several different leaf spot diseases that favor moist weather. Some of the most common diseases people ask about are known as Corynespora leaf spot and Cercospora leaf spot on bigleaf hydrangeas.
Freshly picked blueberries sit in baskets at the University of Georgia horticulture farm in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Essential Oil Grant
Organic fruit and vegetable growers want to meet the recent uptick in national consumer demand, but they need additional tools to battle pests and diseases that often accompany organic crop growth.
Symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings. Brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale, are all susceptible to this plant disease. CAES News
Alternaria blight and head rot
A new multistate project will bring together researchers from the University of Georgia and partner universities to fight Alternaria leaf blight and head rot in broccoli, a plant disease that thrives in warm temperatures and humidity.
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well. CAES News
Making Tomatoes Safer
When vegetable farmers harvest crops, they often rely on postharvest washing to reduce any foodborne pathogens, but a new University of Georgia study shows promise in reducing these pathogens — as well as lowering labor costs — by applying sanitizers to produce while it is still in the fields.
Pecan scab fungus (Fusicladium effusum) is the most destructive disease of pecans in Georgia. CAES News
Fighting Pecan Scab
University of Georgia researchers will begin a series of trials this winter to help identify better management practices for pecan growers in Georgia.
"Mummy berry" disease is easily recognized when the fruit begins to ripen, as infected berries become dry, shrivel and drop prematurely. (UGA Plant Pathology/Bugwood.org) CAES News
Blueberry Fungus
Blueberries are one of the most popular backyard fruits for Georgia because they are relatively low maintenance compared to other fruit species. However, there is one particular disease issue known as “mummy berry” that can be problematic for blueberry growers.
UGA Associate Professor Alexa Lamm has earned the 2020 Borlaug CAST Communication Award from the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology. CAES News
Focusing Horticulture Research
Even if they’re born of the most exemplary research, innovative indoor plant propagation technologies aren’t beneficial if they are too costly to use.
Watermelons harvested on UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Protecting Seasonal Workers
As we approach the harvest season for watermelon, bell pepper, tomato, yellow squash, zucchini, cucumber, sweet corn and other crops, Georgia vegetable growers can move ahead and prepare seasonal workers to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 during harvest time.
Georgia's peach crop is having a resurgence this year thanks to the lack of late freezes and sufficient chilling hours during the winter. CAES News
Backyard Fruits Webinar
Home gardeners who want to expand their edible backyard bounty to include fruits are invited to participate in the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Backyard Fruits webinar series that runs through June 5.