Browse Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production Stories

557 results found for Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production
Grapes grow under protective netting at Stonewall Creek Vineyards in Tiger, Georgia, a host of CAES' Winegrowers of Georgia Internship. (Photo by Chamberlain Smith/UGA) CAES News
New Viticulture Specialist
Georgia’s steadily growing wine industry has a new advocate with the hire of a new University of Georgia Cooperative Extension viticulture specialist to support the more than 85 vineyards throughout the state. Sarah Lowder joined the Department of Horticulture in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences this spring as the state viticulturist, a position dedicated to providing the best methods for the cultivation and harvest of wine grapes in Georgia.
Georgia is well-known as the Peach State, but since 1949 plant breeders at the University of Georgia have been on a blue streak, bringing more than 50 blueberry varieties to market. CAES News
Blueberry Breeding
Georgia has long been referred to as the Peach State, yet the fleshy fruit that adorns souvenirs and license plates isn’t counted among the state’s top 10 commodities. Blueberries join that list. University of Georgia blueberry breeder Scott NeSmith, professor emeritus in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture, has released more than 40 varieties during his career at the university.
Orange spores emerge from southern rust pustules on a corn leaf. The fungal spores associated with this disease can be carried long distances on wind currents from surrounding states. (Submitted photo) CAES News
Southern Corn Rust
The first cases of southern corn rust for the 2023 growing season were discovered on Tuesday, June 20 and Wednesday June 21 in Clinch and Grady Counties , along the Georgia-Florida line. University of Georgia Extension experts are encouraging producers to be diligent in scouting for the fast-spreading disease among their corn crops.
Plants with contrasting or showy characteristics, like this weeping, red, cut-leaf Japanese maple, can provide a clever solution to filling a hole in the landscape. CAES News
Landscape Refresh
Now that the weather has warmed up, many Georgians have found that where their yards once had healthy and full plantings, there are now holes and scraps of plants. Residents of Georgia and other parts of the Southeast inevitably arrive at the same observation: Cold temperatures this past December and weather conditions in subsequent months wreaked havoc on home landscapes.
CAES researchers and UGA Extension agents hope their research findings will provide updated guidelines for producers to improve precooling efficiency and reduce postharvest food losses. CAES News
Reducing Food Waste
Consumers hold high standards for fresh food, which farmers aim to meet, but hot summer temperatures and long-haul deliveries can degrade quality even before produce makes it into stores. In a collaborative study, Angelos Deltsidis, assistant professor of horticulture in the University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, teamed up with UGA Cooperative Extension agents to improve upon a decades-old method of precooling to increase efficiency and reduce postharvest losses along the value chain.
IMG 2016 CAES News
Micro Roses
Roses are red … and dozens of cultivated hues. Whatever their colors, they are among the most popular flower throughout the year for many consumers, from long-stemmed Valentine’s bouquets and Mother’s Day arrangements to a bounty of varieties available for planting in landscapes during the summer and fall.
Georgia continues to be the top pecan-producing state in the U.S. CAES News
Climate Adapted Pecans
Georgia is the nation's leading pecan-producing state — and University of Georgia researchers intend to keep it that way. Working with an international team of experts, four faculty from the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have received a U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture award for the second phase of a study to adapt one of Georgia’s top commodities, the pecan.
Pecan Orchard CAES News
Growing Pecan Markets
Georgia pecan growers are celebrating a huge win as India reduced tariffs on imported pecans by 70% last week following a decades-long effort to open that market for the popular tree nut. Trade missions over the years have sought out viable market opportunities for pecans, which are native to the southeastern U.S. and northern Mexico, but with a historic 100% customs tax on pecans, the market was essentially closed to the global pecan industry — until now.
While blueberries are known to be susceptible to postharvest injuries, resulting in fruit softening or splitting during harvest, handling and storage, UGA researchers are trying to figure out why some crops experience greater losses. CAES News
Blueberry Quality
A multidisciplinary team of University of Georgia agriculture experts are working to determine causes and solutions to postharvest quality problems that have hit Georgia’s blueberry growers hard in recent seasons. Funded by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Research and UGA Cooperative Extension, the project will address “major issues” with fruit quality, particularly in rabbiteye blueberries.
Most of the time, covers are used to reduce frost damage, while freeze damage depends on the plant species. CAES News
Cold Protection Options
Whether you’re a home gardener or a production farmer, Georgia’s mild climate allows for a variety of fruits and vegetables to be grown throughout the year. However, with erratic weather events and broad temperature swings during the winter and early spring months, having a few cold protection resources on hand can help you weather the unpredictability.