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Extension Publications
Economic Impact of the Georgia Green Industry, 2013 (C 1138) Published 7/18/2018

The state of Georgia ranked ninth out of all states in 2013 for green industry (not including sod production, as this was not included in the analysis) economic contributions (including multiplier effects) to employment (64,066 jobs) and GDP ($3.79 billion) and tenth in total industry output ($6.72 billion). The largest individual sector in regard to output and employment both directly and indirectly was landscape services, representing nearly 57% of industry employment and 39% of economic output. The Georgia green industry represented 0.83% of Georgia gross domestic product (GDP), higher than that of the U.S. green industry as a whole at 0.72% U.S. GDP.

Organic Pecan Production (B 1493) Published 7/3/2018

Organic food production is one of the fastest-growing sectors of the American food marketplace and is driven largely by personal health preferences and environmental ethics. Organic food sales in the United States rose from $13 billion in 2005 to $35 billion in 2014. Organic farmers are required to follow an ecological soil management program and are restricted in their use of chemicals. In order for a crop to be marketed as organic, it must obtain organic certification and maintain records of the production practices in use on the farm. See the USDA's organic certification information at the following website: https://www.usda.gov/topics/organic. A three-year transition period is required before the crop can be sold as “organic” and use the USDA certified-organic seal. Pecan production generates unique challenges to organic production methods in the humid Southeastern U.S. because it is an environment conducive to heavy pressure from insects, diseases, and weeds. Therefore, the foundation of any organic pecan production program in the Southeastern U.S. will be based on selection for pest-resistant cultivars.

Aerating Grain in Storage (B 712) Published 6/29/2018

Aeration conditions grain and seed by lowering the temperature of the material and equalizing the temperature within the storage structure. This prevents moisture migration and condensation and can reduce losses during storage.

Greenhouses: Heating, Cooling and Ventilation (B 792) Published 6/29/2018

This publication contains comprehensive, in-depth information about heating, cooling and ventilating greenhouses.

Propagating Deciduous Fruit Plants Common to Georgia (B 818) Published 6/29/2018

Deciduous fruit plants common to Georgia must be propagated asexually because they do not come true to seed. This makes it necessary to reproduce the desired fruit plants by methods such as cuttings, runners, layering, budding or grafting. This publication discusses the common techniques used to asexually propagate fruit plants adapted to Georgia.

Hobby Greenhouses (B 910) Published 6/29/2018

The gardener who has a greenhouse can extend or intermingle the seasons at will. Whether you wish to build your own greenhouse from scratch or purchase a prefabricated structure ready for assembly, this publication explains everything you need to know about building and maintaining a hobby greenhouse. This publication also includes several building design plans.

Basic Principles of Pruning Woody Plants (B 949) Published 6/29/2018

Pruning is one of the most important cultural practices for maintaining woody plants, including ornamental trees and shrubs, fruits and nuts. Proper pruning requires a basic understanding of how plants respond to various pruning cuts. The principles and guidelines in this publication will help you master common pruning techniques.

Flowering Annuals for Georgia Gardens (B 954) Published 6/29/2018

Annuals are the mainstay color plant of many home gardens. They are also used in increasingly large numbers in commercial and municipal landscapes because they provide landscape color in a very short time with minimal investment. Properly cared for, many annuals will brighten the landscape continuously from spring until frost kills them in the fall.


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