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Extension Publications
Basic Introduction to Broiler Housing Environmental Control (B 1264) Published 9/22/2017

Research on improving broiler housing is ongoing. Energy costs are becoming more significant to the grower's bottom line and housing construction, equipment and operation will be paramount in helping to make sure the houses are operated as efficiently as possible. As technology and equipment is redesigned and developed, researchers will continue to examine how broiler housing can be heated, cooled, and built in such a way that modern broilers continue to reach their genetic potential using the most economical and efficient methods.

Africanized Honey Bees (B 1290) Published 9/20/2017

Honey bees are among the most well-known and economically important insects. They produce honey and beeswax, and pollinate many crops. In spite of the alarm surrounding Africanization, these bees have not caused widespread or permanent chaos. Dramatic stinging incidents do occur, but the quality of life for most people is unaffected. Typically, the commercial beekeeping industries of Africanized areas suffer temporary decline and then eventually recover.

Freezing Prepared Foods (FDNS-E-43-14) Published 9/13/2017

Foods for packed lunches or elaborate dinners can be kept in your freezer ready for busy days, parties or unexpected company. By planning a steady flow of casseroles, main dishes, baked goods and desserts in and out of your freezer, you can make good use of your freezer and good use of your time. This publication provides information on preparing to freeze, packaging, and storage. It also provides specific directions for freezing a variety of prepared foods. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.

Canning Vegetables (FDNS-E-43-03) Published 9/13/2017

Pressure canning is the only safe method of canning all vegetables (except tomatoes). The Clostridium botulinum microorganism is the main reason pressure canning is necessary. This publication provides directions on how to safely preserve specific vegetables with a pressure canner. Information on equipment, preparation, and processing are given, as well as information on how to guard against spoilage. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.

Oxygen Depletion in Ponds (C 1048) Published 9/13/2017

Fish ponds may experience a loss of oxygen at any time of the year, depending on the weather and amount of nutrient enrichment the pond has received; however, most oxygen depletions occur in warm weather and usually follow a period of cloudy, overcast conditions. Low oxygen concentration in pond water means stress and possibly death for the pond fish. When fish die from low oxygen, there can be serious financial consequences for commercial fish operations; for example, largemouth bass, bream and grass carp can be worth more than $3,000.00 per acre. Therefore, pond owners should consider a plan to provide aeration for their ponds before oxygen depletions occur.

Honey Bee Swarms and Bees in Walls (C 824) Published 9/13/2017

This circular is for property owners who have unwanted honey bee swarms on their lands or colonies nesting inside walls. It explains these natural processes and gives options for dealing with them.

Canning Fruit (FDNS-E-43-01) Published 9/13/2017

When fruits are canned, they are heated hot enough and long enough to destroy spoilage organisms. This heating (or processing) also stops the action of enzymes that can spoil food quality. Because fruits have a high acid content, processing can be done in a boiling water bath canner or in a pressure canner. This publication provides information on equipment and materials needed for canning fruit as well as instructions for before, after, and during the preservation process. Preparation methods and processing times for specific fruits are also given. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.

Water Quality and Common Treatments for Private Drinking Water Systems (B 939) Published 9/13/2017

An abundant supply of clean, safe drinking water is essential for human and animal health. Water from municipal or public water systems is treated and monitored to ensure that it is safe for human consumption. Many Georgia residents, especially in rural areas, rely on private water systems for human and livestock consumption. Most private water systems are supplied by wells. Water from wells in Georgia is generally safe for consumption without treatment. Some waters, however, may contain disease-causing organisms that make them unsafe to drink. Well waters may also contain large amounts of minerals, making them too “hard” for uses such as laundering, bathing or cooking. Some contaminants may cause human health hazards and others can stain clothing and fixtures, cause objectionable tastes and odors, or corrode pipes and other system components.


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