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Commodities: Field Crops: Tobacco

GEORGIA TOBACCO HOTLINE

The Georgia Tobacco Hotline is a continuous blog of timely production, management and marketing information relating to flue-cured tobacco.

To access the Georgia Tobacco Hotline in blog format please click the following link:

http://blog.extension.uga.edu/tobacco/

 

A Good Day For Transplanting Tobacco in Florida (Click to see link)

J. Michael Moore

March 27, 2014

 

Greenhouse Tobacco Being Attacked by Collar Rot (Click to see link)

J. Michael Moore

March 27, 2014

Non-Combusted LP Gas in a Closed Greenhouse (Click to see link)

J. Michael Moore

March 13, 2014

Rhizoctonia Present in Greenhouse Production(Click to see link)

J. Michael Moore

March 9, 2014

Georgia Tobacco Commission Conducts Assessment Increase Referendum(Click for article)

 

Tobacco Greenhouse Insect Infestation

Vegetable Weevil Larvae Damaging Tobacco in Greenhouses

 

Vegetable weevil larvae were the first insects found in a greenhouse in 2014. For control acephate should be applied to the foliage at 0.75 Tablespoons in 3 gallons of water per every 1,000 sq. ft. of seedlings.

J. Michael Moore

February 25, 2014

 

John Smith and Grant Carter are proud of their "Georgia Grown" tobacco crop.

John Smith and his dad Mike Smith are in to tagging. They like the "Georgia Grown" bale stickers, but they like to document where each bale came from with their own tags by Grower Name, Weight, Barn, Date, and Farm.
John Smith of Coffee County is proud of his "Georgia Grown" tobacco and he can tell you lots about its origin.
Grant Carter of Irwin County is a first time tobacco grower and looks forward to next year. Grant requested "Georgia Grown" stickers and has put them to good use.
Grant Carter's "Georgia Grown" tobacco is a result of lots of help from neighbors, fiends, Fort Valley and UGA Extension and his dependable crew.

"Georgia Grown" Tobacco Bale Stickers are provided by the Georgia Tobacco Commission and are available upon request by contacting your local county extension agent.

J. Michael Moore

September 25, 2013

 

Kenneth and Jason Williams are using "Georgia Grown" bale stickers on their tobacco crop.

Jason Williams of Jeff Davis County applies stickers to some of his bales before sending them to the receiving station. Photo courtesy of Tim Varnedore.
Kenneth and Jason Williams of Jeff Davis County are proud of the quality they have produced from a crop that has required much additional work in the field. Photo courtesy of Tim Varnedore.
Tobacco from the Williams Farm looks good after arriving at the receiving station.
"Georgia Grown" tobacco which recieved over 50 inches of rainfall from transplanting until the end of August has suffered from lost nutrients and damaged root systems will soon be out of the field in Coffee Co..

"Georgia Grown" Tobacco Bale Stickers are provided by the Georgia Tobacco Commission and are available upon request by contacting your local county extension agent.

J. Michael Moore

September 7, 2013

 

More Growers Getting in the Act of Applying "Georgia Grown" Tobacco Bale Stickers and Showing Off the Quality of Their Crop.

Fred Wetherington, chairman of the Georgia Tobacco Commission, adds Georgia Grown tobacco bale stickers to tobacco headed for the market.
Jerry Wooten, Jeff Davis County tobacco grower attaches a "Georgia Grown" bale sticker to tobacco headed to the market. Not the heaviest crop in Georgia history, but one with the most uniform quality in recent memory.
County Agent, Justin Shealey with, Stanley Corbett and son, Bo, who grow tobacco in Echols and Lowndes Counties. They are proud of the quality produced from a tough growing season.
"Georgia Grown" tobacco bale stickers are pretty showy on this Troy Aldridge tobacco produced in Coffee County.

"Georgia Grown" Tobacco Bale Stickers are provided by the Georgia Tobacco Commission and are available upon request by contacting your local county extension agent.

J. Michael Moore

August 29, 2013

 

 

"Georgia Grown" Tobacco Bale Stickers Are Beginning to be Seen at the Receiving Stations

Sporting a new "Georgia Grown" tobacco bale sticker. Courtesy of the Georgia Tobacco Commission
Lowndes County Extension Coordinator, Jake Price and Wetherington Farms farm Manager, Roger Gay send off a bale of Georgia Grown Tobacco to the receiving station.
Brant Clifton sends his first bales to market carrying the "Georgia Grown" tobacco bale stickers
"Georgia Grown" tobacco bale stickers are pretty showy.

 

J. Michael Moore

August 22, 2013

 

Georgia Tobacco Commission Distributes "Georgia Grown" Bale Stickers to Promote Georgia Tobacco

We're proud to see a good quality crop sporting the new tobacco bale stickers indicating "Georgia Grown" provided by the Georgia Tobacco Commission. Georgia Grown Tobacco Bale Stickers may be requested by Georgia tobacco growers by contacting their county extension agent based on one per bale to be produced in 2013.


J. Michael Moore

August 20, 2013


Rain delays Georgia Sucker Control Sprays and Harvest the Week of July 4th

Daily rainfall during the week of July 4th slowed tobacco managment activities including application of sucker control chemicals, especially maleic hydrazide (MH), application of additional fertilizer to correct for leaching and root damage, and the beginning the first harvest. This followed a wetter than normal June and causing average accumulated rainfall for 2013 in the tobacco growing areas of Georgia to be greater than for 2010, 2011, 2011 and the average of 1971 - 2000.

http://www.intellicast.com/National/Precipitation/Weekly.aspx?location=USGA0132

precip

 

J. Michael Moore

July 6, 2013

 

Rain delays Georgia Sucker Control Sprays and Harvest the Week of July 4th

Daily rainfall during the week of July 4th slowed tobacco managment activities including application of sucker control chemicals, especially maleic hydrazide (MH), application of additional fertilizer to correct for leaching and root damage, and the beginning the first harvest. This followed a wetter than normal June and causing average accumulated rainfall for 2013 in the tobacco growing areas of Georgia to be greater than for 2010, 2011, 2011 and the average of 1971 - 2000.

http://www.intellicast.com/National/Precipitation/Weekly.aspx?location=USGA0132

precip

 

J. Michael Moore

July 6, 2013

Georgia-Florida Tobacco Tour Booklet and Images Posted

The Georgia - Florida Tobacco Tour was conducted June 10, 11, 12, 2013 and covered much of the tobacco growing area of Georgia and Florida. Visit the Tour Archives on the UGA Tobacco Web Page to see a link to the tour booklet and a link to images from the tour. See the 2013 GA-FL Tobacco Tour Book and Tour Images to see what and who we saw. http://www.caes.uga.edu/commodities/fieldcrops/tobacco/tours/archives.html

J. Michael Moore

July 6, 2013

Georgia-Florida Tobacco Tour plans and registration

The Georgia - Florida Tobacco Tour will begin with a Kick-Off Supper at Mixon's Pond House in Waresboro, Georgia, on Monday, June 10, and end near Lake City, Florida on Wednesday, June 12, 2013. See our website for more details and registration.

http://www.caes.uga.edu/commodities/fieldcrops/tobacco/tours/index.html

J. Michael Moore

May 25, 2013

 

Early season problems in Georgia tobacco.

Several field visits of a number of crops have found root systems filled with galls and obvious nematode problems. A wet spring which delayed and in some cases prevented fumigation of some fields have pointed out more of a nematode problem than the varietal resistance available from our commonly planted varieties. In addition to the wet soils the air and soil temperatures were extremely low and seem to have delayed plant establishment and root growth in the early season.

 

Cold injury occurred to plants in the field in a number of locations this spring when temperatures fell into the low 30's after transplanting resulting in discoloration of leaves which called attention to this odd occurence. These leaves will likely not be harvested and plants have grown normally after weather changes have brought warmer temperatures.

Tobacco splitworms have returned to plague the 2013 Georgia tobacco crop in the early season. Damage most often seen relating to splitworms are the mines in the leaves. However in 2012 and now 2013 fields not receiving Coragen as a transplant water treatment are generally showing leaf injury as well as feeding in the bud similar to and perhaps worse than that caused by tobacco budworms. The entire bud is damaged and there is rapid growth of suckers from all the leaf axils. As many as 10 percent of the plants in some fields have been observed to have bud damage from splitworm feeding. No foliar treatments have been shown to be helpful in controlling splitworm infestations.

Lightning was blamed for an unusual field problem came to our attention on Tuesday after a Saturday thunderstorm moved across the state. The appearance in the field was more linear, but ran diagonally across the field even splitting into two areas of smaller plants whose lower leaves were curled with some midribs darkened and leading to a burned leaf tip on some leaves. Some of the small plants were also found to have darkened internal stalks. It appeared that the leaf tissue continued to grow in spite of the lack of growth of the damaged midribs causing a curving and puckering of the leaves. Although normally seen to cause a circular pattern of damage in a tobacco field, this case lacked this pattern.

Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus incidence in fields treated with imidacloprid and Actigard continues to be less than predicted with the statewide average still less than 5 percent of the plants. Although early season infection usually results in the plant death, later infection usually results in partial plant loss.

J. Michael Moore

May 25, 2013

 

 

More rain and cool temperatures delay final transplanting and cause stand reductions.

Multiple days with rainfall this week have further delayed the end of transplanting in Georgia and resulted in increased loss of seedlings in fields throughout the state.

Rhizoctonia soreshin was determined to be responsible for as much as twenty percent of the plants in some fields found to be wiling and dying as a result of rotting stems. See examples below.

K Wms Rhizoc

Rhizoctonia soreshin

Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus has started to appear in plants treated with Admire Pro and/or Actigard as well as those with no treatment. One field near the GA-FL line which received no treatment was found to have 10% of the plants showing TSWV symptoms. Other fields in both Florida and Georgia were not found to have an incidence this high.

DDeasTSWV

Tobacco Budworms were found to have exceeded the treatmnet threshold of 10% of the plants with feeding worms as early as 10 days ago. This field had already received two foliar applications of insecticide.

DDeasTBW

Cucumber Mosaic Virus was observed on one farm in Florida in a corner of a field where this disease appears whenever tobacco transplanted in this field which is near a dwelling house and pecan trees. The incidence of CMV was reduced dramatically in Florida tobacco production nearly 10 years ago when the last transplants were grown in field beds on farm in the state.

JLordCMV

J. Michael Moore

May 5, 2013



A cool, wet start to another Georgia - Florida Tobacco Crop

Tobacco transplanting was nearing the end by April 26th. Soils remained wet and next week carries a high percentage chance rain each day. James Jacobs found cutworms in a field in Pierce County. Eddie Beasley confirmed rhizoctonia causing stems to rot in 20% of a field in Berrien County. David Spaid also found a small percentage of plants in fields in Candler County with rhizoctonia. Agents assisting Dr. Paul Bertrand with TSWV baseline plots including untreated plants as well as plants treated with Actigard and Admire Pro began to evaluate the plants in these plots for the first time approximately two weeks after transplanting. So far no reports of tomato spotted wilt virus. Rhizoctonia soreshin

J. Michael Moore

April 26, 2013


Quadris application in the greenhouse for target spot control

For two years growers have had the opportunity to make one application of Quadris prior to transplanting for control of Target Spot in the greenhouse (http://www.ipmimages.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=5368656 ) prior to these plants going to the field.  Now is the time to be familiar with this labeling and to make a correct application if needed.  As plants reach their full height in the greenhouse they create an environment at the tray surface that is very conducive to infection with target spot.  Frequent rainfall and delays in going to the field mean plants may remain in the greenhouse with the curtains closed for longer periods than planned.  This will increase the likelihood of seedling diseases. 

See below an excerpt from our letter requesting this use.

The purpose of this letter is to support an application from Syngenta Crop Protection for a
Special Local Needs 24c label for azoxystrobin (Quadris™) to control target leaf spot
(Thanatephorus cucumeris) on tobacco transplants in greenhouses. Target Spot is a foliar disease of tobacco caused by basidiospores of the sexual stage (Thanatephorus cucumeris) of Rhizoctonia solani. This disease becomes more common during the last 4 weeks of the tobacco transplant production season, and under moist conditions can spread quite rapidly. Target spot is, unfortunately, an annual problem in many tobacco transplant greenhouses.

Target Spot not only damages tobacco seedlings directly, but also predisposes the plants to several other major diseases that are at least as damaging. Disease complexes involving Collar Rot (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) and Bacterial Soft Rot (Erwinia spp.) are of particular concern. The fungicides available to tobacco growers in Georgia for foliar disease control in the greenhouse are limited to a few, very old, mancozeb products (Dithane, Manzate, Penncozeb). These fungicides are valuable tools in preventative spray schedules before disease has been observed, but their activity isn’t sufficient to provide satisfactory control under moderate to heavy disease pressure.

J. Michael Moore

April 5, 2013

 

 

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