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Research at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Research

Recent News in Research

Satsuma Oranges

July 22, 2014 — A popular citrus crop commonly grown by homeowners has become a highly sought after commodity for some south Georgia farmers. And one University of Georgia Extension agent believes Satsuma oranges will soon be a valuable crop. more >>

Yellow Bud Disease

July 17, 2014 — Georgia is the only state that produces sweet Vidalia onions. It’s also the only state where onion farmers are tackling a new disease — yellow bud. more >>

Watermelon Crop

July 16, 2014 — Good yields, reasonable prices early in the season and low disease pressure has Georgia’s watermelon crop producing sweet results, says one University of Georgia vegetable horticulturist. more >>

4H20 Camp

June 25, 2014 — Southwest Georgia 4-Hers were soaked with information this week as they learned about one of the world’s most prized resources — water. more >>

Feral Hog Damage

June 20, 2014 — Feral hogs may be prime prey for hunters, but to Georgia farmers they’re the ultimate predator. They destroy farmland, eat away at a farmer’s crops and drastically reduce potential profits. more >>

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Making Life Better

For more than 100 years, scientists working at University of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations have conducted research to improve the quality of life for Georgians and for citizens worldwide.

Their research is conducted in laboratories across the state on three main UGA research campuses, located in Athens, Griffin and Tifton; six research and education centers; and research farms. At these locations, researchers can conduct experiments under varying geographic and climatic conditions across the state.

These studies focus on making our food supply safer and longer-lasting, breeding landscape plants that use less water and require less pesticides, monitoring greenhouse gases and other pollutants, creating leaner cuts of meat through alternative livestock diets and creating new and useful products from crop by-products.

UGA agricultural scientists continue to conduct ground-breaking and life-changing research in much the same way their counterparts did 100 years ago when they bred Empire Cotton, a variety that saved the state's cotton industry and put cotton back on the throne in Georgia agriculture.

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University of Georgia (UGA) College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES)