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Research at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences


Recent News in Research

Zika Virus Research

October 20, 2016 — A University of Georgia graduate student is using early stage chicken embryos to monitor the progression of the Zika virus. By collecting data on how the virus affects brain development, researchers at UGA can pinpoint the best treatments to stop or slow the progression of early-stage microcephaly, a rare birth defect linked to the Zika virus. more >>

Sunbelt 2016

October 18, 2016 — University of Georgia President Jere W. Morehead and other UGA administrators celebrated the opening of the 2016 Sunbelt Agricultural Expo by visiting the trade show Oct. 18 in Moultrie, Georgia. more >>

Service Learning

September 28, 2016 — A group of Griffin High School biology students visited the University of Georgia Griffin Campus last week to conduct a science experiment under the direction of college students. The UGA students learned to give back to the community and the high school students were exposed to college life and scientific laboratory equipment. more >>


September 14, 2016 — Whether you are working with three laying hens in a backyard coop or a farm full of broilers, chickens need proper nutrition to live healthy, low-stress lives. more >>


September 9, 2016 — University of Georgia students and faculty came together to kick off the inaugural FABricate competition, a food and agribusiness entrepreneurial initiative at UGA, on Sept. 8. more >>


Making Life Better

For more than 100 years, scientists working at University of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations have conducted research to improve the quality of life for Georgians and for citizens worldwide.

Their research is conducted in laboratories across the state on three main UGA research campuses, located in Athens, Griffin and Tifton; six research and education centers; and research farms. At these locations, researchers can conduct experiments under varying geographic and climatic conditions across the state.

These studies focus on making our food supply safer and longer-lasting, breeding landscape plants that use less water and require less pesticides, monitoring greenhouse gases and other pollutants, creating leaner cuts of meat through alternative livestock diets and creating new and useful products from crop by-products.

UGA agricultural scientists continue to conduct ground-breaking and life-changing research in much the same way their counterparts did 100 years ago when they bred Empire Cotton, a variety that saved the state's cotton industry and put cotton back on the throne in Georgia agriculture.

University of Georgia (UGA) College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES)