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Research at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Research

Recent News in Research

Cotton Cover Crop

July 27, 2015 — Georgia cotton farmers can benefit from using rye as a cover crop, according to scientists on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus. Along with providing an added defense against glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth at planting, rye significantly reduces thrips infestations and could save farmers irrigation expenses. more >>

Young Scholars 2015

July 23, 2015 — This summer 83 high school students from across Georgia gained real-world research experience through the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences' (CAES) Young Scholars Program. more >>

Dean Angle

July 17, 2015 — J. Scott Angle, who has served as dean and director of the University of Georgia‚Äôs College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences for the past decade, has announced that he will step down from his position to lead a global organization that works to alleviate hunger more >>

Nematode Management

July 9, 2015 — In addition to low prices, controlling nematodes is top priority for Georgia cotton farmers. But with one effective control method being taken away and a new one in short supply, University of Georgia researchers and Cooperative Extension agents are working quickly to help farmers find a solution. more >>

Pecan Blog

July 1, 2015 — A pecan blog is helping University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulture specialist Lenny Wells reach growers in Georgia and across the world. more >>

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Making Life Better

For more than 100 years, scientists working at University of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations have conducted research to improve the quality of life for Georgians and for citizens worldwide.

Their research is conducted in laboratories across the state on three main UGA research campuses, located in Athens, Griffin and Tifton; six research and education centers; and research farms. At these locations, researchers can conduct experiments under varying geographic and climatic conditions across the state.

These studies focus on making our food supply safer and longer-lasting, breeding landscape plants that use less water and require less pesticides, monitoring greenhouse gases and other pollutants, creating leaner cuts of meat through alternative livestock diets and creating new and useful products from crop by-products.

UGA agricultural scientists continue to conduct ground-breaking and life-changing research in much the same way their counterparts did 100 years ago when they bred Empire Cotton, a variety that saved the state's cotton industry and put cotton back on the throne in Georgia agriculture.

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University of Georgia (UGA) College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES)