Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
UGA poultry breeding program has wider implications for understanding human health
As far as poultry farmers are concerned, feed equals money. The more efficient chickens are at turning feed into thighs, breast and drumsticks, the healthier their bottom line. It turns out that the same science that can help poultry farmers raise more feed-efficient chickens could help people become healthier, too.
With the help of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Ratcliffe Scholarship Program, Jacqueline Kessler, a fourth-year environmental economics and management major, took an internship with the Environmental Law Institute remotely while participating in an exchange program in Pamplona, Spain. CAES News
With the help of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Ratcliffe Scholarship Program, Jacqueline Kessler, a fourth-year environmental economics and management major, took an internship with the Environmental Law Institute remotely while participating in an exchange program in Pamplona, Spain.
Ratcliffe Scholars program provides CAES students opportunities of a lifetime
Whether it’s seeing a historical garden firsthand, taking an internship out of state or making your first trip to a professional conference, experiences outside the classroom help students make the most of their time at college.
Dairy cows grazing in Oglethorpe County. CAES News
Dairy cows grazing in Oglethorpe County.
New CAES farm manager corrals livestock and staff on the farm
Managing one farm is a big job; managing a network of four teaching and research farms for the University of Georgia takes a different breed of farmer.
UGA's Tim Coolong was recognized at the Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable Conference on Saturday, January 12, 2019. Coolong received the Donnie H. Morris Award of Excellence in Extension. CAES News
UGA's Tim Coolong was recognized at the Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable Conference on Saturday, January 12, 2019. Coolong received the Donnie H. Morris Award of Excellence in Extension.
UGA faculty, Extension agents honored for work in fruit and vegetable industry
University of Georgia vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong received the Donnie H. Morris Award of Excellence in Extension during the Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable Conference in Savannah, Georgia, on Jan. 12.
UGA's Adam Rabinowitz, peanut economist on the UGA Tifton campus, speaks during the 2018 Georgia Ag Forecast meeting in Bainbridge, Georgia. CAES News
UGA's Adam Rabinowitz, peanut economist on the UGA Tifton campus, speaks during the 2018 Georgia Ag Forecast meeting in Bainbridge, Georgia.
Georgia Ag Forecast and resource fair to offer assistance to hurricane-affected communities
South Georgia farmers, community leaders and business owners recovering from Hurricane Michael can learn about additional recovery assistance available at a free resource fair immediately following the upcoming 2019 Georgia Ag Forecast meetings in Bainbridge, Georgia, on Jan. 31 and in Tifton, Georgia, on Feb. 1.
Pride Road's hibiscus jelly was a finalist in Flavor of Georgia's 2018 Jams and Jellies category. The University of Georgia's Food Product Innovation and Commercialization (FoodPIC) Center in Griffin, Georgia, helped the Smyrna, Georgia, company dry the fresh flowers and then make them into a range of hibiscus products: jelly, jam, tea and chutney. Pride Road's owners (center) are shown at the 2018 Flavor of Georgia contest with members of the FoodPIC staff. CAES News
Pride Road's hibiscus jelly was a finalist in Flavor of Georgia's 2018 Jams and Jellies category. The University of Georgia's Food Product Innovation and Commercialization (FoodPIC) Center in Griffin, Georgia, helped the Smyrna, Georgia, company dry the fresh flowers and then make them into a range of hibiscus products: jelly, jam, tea and chutney. Pride Road's owners (center) are shown at the 2018 Flavor of Georgia contest with members of the FoodPIC staff.
UGA FoodPIC often behind successful Flavor of Georgia contest winners
For the past 12 years, Georgia-based food companies have competed in the Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest. Being named a finalist — or better, a winner — in one of the contest’s categories is a great boost for companies seeking success in the competitive food industry. A few of last year’s winners had one thing in common: They have worked with the University of Georgia’s Food Product Innovation and Commercialization Center (FoodPIC).
UGA's newest pecan variety, ‘Avalon’, in 2017. The pecan's extreme resistance to scab disease makes it desirable for pecan farmers looking to replenish their crop after Hurricane Michael. CAES News
UGA's newest pecan variety, ‘Avalon’, in 2017. The pecan's extreme resistance to scab disease makes it desirable for pecan farmers looking to replenish their crop after Hurricane Michael.
'Avalon' a quality cultivar for Georgia pecan farmers
Georgia pecan producers who are looking to replenish their crop after Hurricane Michael can turn to the ‘Avalon’ variety for a nut that produces high yields and is highly resistant to scab disease, according to University of Georgia pecan breeder Patrick Conner.
Becky Griffin recently completed her master's degree from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, a goal she has had for the past 30 years. Her daughters Allison (left) and Mady (right) are also UGA graduates. They are shown with Griffin (center) by The Arch on the UGA campus. Tradition dictates that students should not walk through The Arch until they have graduated. CAES News
Becky Griffin recently completed her master's degree from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, a goal she has had for the past 30 years. Her daughters Allison (left) and Mady (right) are also UGA graduates. They are shown with Griffin (center) by The Arch on the UGA campus. Tradition dictates that students should not walk through The Arch until they have graduated.
UGA-Griffin student returns to college after 30-year break
At 54, Becky Griffin was the oldest University of Georgia student on the Griffin campus to be awarded a degree this fall, but that fact only fueled her drive to succeed. After putting her graduate studies on hold for 30 years, Griffin juggled a full-time job and put thousands of miles on her car to complete her master’s degree.
UGA organic horticulture expert Julia Gaskin is shown teaching participants about soil composition at the 2011 Georgia Organics Conference. Gaskin will help lead a presentation during the 2019 Georgia Organics Conference in Tifton, Georgia on Feb. 8-9. CAES News
UGA organic horticulture expert Julia Gaskin is shown teaching participants about soil composition at the 2011 Georgia Organics Conference. Gaskin will help lead a presentation during the 2019 Georgia Organics Conference in Tifton, Georgia on Feb. 8-9.
UGA faculty, staff to present findings at Georgia Organics Conference
With demand rising for organic produce and the industry growing to meet the need, the Georgia Organics Conference is a pivotal event for educating organic growers in Georgia and throughout the South.