News Stories - Page 5

Prolific weeds like buttercup compete with underlying grasses and can reduce their growth in the spring. This reduces the amount of forage yield available for livestock grazing pastures, and fescue lawns or pastures may end up with bare spots as a result of this competition. CAES News
What's up, buttercup? Prolific weed competes with forage grasses and grains
Spring has undoubtedly arrived in Georgia. Local pastures and lawns remind me of the lyrics from “America the Beautiful,” “Oh beautiful, for spacious skies, for amber waves of grain.” Except that almost every call this week has been about amber waves of buttercup, something that neither livestock nor humans like to eat.
Mark Jaronski, deputy commissioner for tourism with the Georgia Department of Economic Development, delivered the keynote at the inaugural Georgia Hospitality and Tourism Summit on May 2. CAES News
Inaugural HOST Summit highlights UGA impact on hospitality and tourism
More than 100 University of Georgia faculty, staff, students and external stakeholders involved in the hospitality and tourism industry gathered May 2 for the inaugural Georgia Hospitality and Tourism Summit organized by the UGA HOST Research Initiative.
Shown, from left, are parents Chad and Tabby Albritton, UGA Student Employee of the Year Christian Albritton, and nominator UGA Extension 4-H Specialist Kasey Bozeman. (Photo by Justin Evans) CAES News
CAES double major Christian Albritton named UGA Student Employee of the Year
The University of Georgia’s annual Student Employee of the Year Awards Luncheon brought together 100 of UGA’s top student employees as determined by supervisor nomination. Christian Albritton, a third-year avian biology and biological science double major from Butler, Georgia, was selected as the 2022 Student Employee of the Year thanks to his work with Georgia 4-H.
UGA's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will host its convocation ceremony Thursday, May 12, at The Classic Center. UGA's commencement ceremonies will be held Friday, May 13, at Sanford Stadium for undergraduate students and Stegeman Coliseum for graduate students. CAES News
CAES honors its newest class of graduates May 12
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will celebrate its newest graduating class at a convocation ceremony at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 12, at The Classic Center in Athens. 
Farm Stress Summit CAES News
Rural stress summit to connect Georgia farmers with community resources
Farm family health and wellness is a priority for many rural Georgia communities. As the backbone of Georgia’s No. 1 industry, agricultural producers face unprecedented pressures, including increasing input costs, a flood of produce imports, labor shortages, pandemic protocols for worker safety and more.
The four-day event, held in person at Young Harris College, is an immersion experience for anyone interested in bees and beekeeping, regardless of experience level. Registration is open through May 16 CAES News
Young Harris Beekeeping Institute celebrates 30th anniversary
Beekeepers, it’s time to grab your smoker and hive tool — the Young Harris Beekeeping Institute will celebrate its 30th year May 18 to 21. The four-day event, held in-person at Young Harris College, is an immersion experience for anyone interested in bees and beekeeping, regardless of experience level. Registration is open through May 16.
Kelseyresearchpic ent CAES News
How some beneficial insects use viruses to protect their young
Inheriting a virus may sound like an undesirable bequest, but for certain insects, the phenomenon of beneficial virus inheritance is key to their survival. In the case of certain parasitoid wasps, viruses not only help these beneficial insects survive, they eliminate many agricultural pests in the process.
Indian   NA Group Photo (1) CAES News
'Finding unconventional solutions for very big problems'
Researchers from the University of Georgia’s Center for Food Safety and Department of Food Science and Technology are expanding their global networks to increase the safety of the global food supply in the U.S. and abroad. 
Sod prices, such as for bermudagrasses like those developed by UGA turfgrass breeders, are higher this year for homeowners and industry. CAES News
Less availability, higher transportation costs spike sod prices in early 2022
Low inventory of some varieties, combined with economic pressures exacerbated by supply chain and global issues, are pushing up the price of a meticulously manicured lawn this spring.