News Stories - Page 10

While specialty beef that is grass-fed, pasture-raised or organic also commands higher prices, Fluharty explained that marketing is key to success. CAES News
Unpacking consumer demand for high-priced, high-quality beef
Rising prices may induce consumer ire, but some meat-eaters are willing to fork over the cash for high-quality beef. Rising food costs continue to attract negative attention from consumers around the country due to supply chain issues and inflation, but consumer demand for top-quality beef is on pace with a greater supply of higher-quality meat being produced by the beef industry.
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Research in plant genomics is answering big biological questions
Since Robin Buell joined the University of Georgia faculty in fall 2021, there’s been a flurry of activity in her lab. Buell and her researchers have nine projects underway in plant genomics – and Buell has already secured millions of dollars in federal funding.
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Gently Soap cleans up at inaugural Floor and Décor UGA Venture Prize Competition
When Kristen Dunning participated in her first UGA Entrepreneurship Idea Accelerator Program, she was a woman with sensitive skin, a knack for plants and a dream of selling soap to the masses.
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5 reasons to file: Free tax assistance from UGA VITA program
Filing taxes can be intimidating, but the University of Georgia can help. The UGA Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program has provided free tax preparation services to Athens and surrounding areas for over 15 years and recently added a virtual component that allows for statewide access for online tax filing.
On agriculture Twitter, it’s not unusual to see @PrecAgEngineer tweeting about all things agriculture tech. From the latest field data collection to his daughter’s first attendance at a professional conference, Virk believes there is value in helping the public understand the role agriculture takes in our daily lives. CAES News
Precision Ag Researcher of the Year Simer Virk weighs in on the future of agriculture
Asked what his day looks like on a regular basis, Simer Virk laughed out loud. “There are no average days in research and Extension work — every day is different and every season is different,” said Virk, an assistant professor and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension precision agriculture specialist in UGA's Department of Crop and Soil Sciences.
Janey Miller, center, was one of nine 4-H’ers recently elected to the 4-H Southwest District senior board of directors. CAES News
4-H grows tomorrow’s leaders
What do a sixth-grader with a prize-winning cow, a home-schooled forestry enthusiast, a singer who aspires to a medical career and a teenager who enjoys dance and choreography have in common? They’re all members of the largest youth-leadership organization in the country: 4-H.
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New software from CAES improves accuracy of DNA sequence analysis
Researchers from the University of Georgia’s Center for Food Safety have developed software that functions as an important step in improving the accuracy of DNA sequence analysis when testing for microbial contamination.
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CAES alumnus Robert Jones follows trail blazed by Mary Frances Early
Sixty years ago, Mary Frances Early blazed a trail as the first Black graduate of the University of Georgia. Robert J. Jones, chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, followed that trail years later and shared his experiences during the 2022 Mary Frances Early Lecture, held Feb. 22 in Mahler Hall at the Georgia Center for Continuing Education & Hotel.​​​​​​​
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Protect backyard flocks from avian influenza
New outbreaks of avian influenza (flu) have been detected in U.S. aquatic birds, commercial poultry and backyard flocks since January. Although avian influenza is not a threat to human health or food safety in Georgia, avian flu presents a risk to all poultry operations, from hobbyist flocks to the state's $22.8 billion commercial industry.