An Asian longhorned beetle chews through wood. CAES News
Establishment of more invasive species a concern for UGA experts
Over the next 10 years, the number of cargo containers operating out of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, is expected to double. While additional cargo means increased revenue for the state, Chuck Bargeron, associate director of the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, is concerned it could also lead to the establishment of more invasive species.
Watermelons sit in a truck after being harvested on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Rainy month increases likelihood for watermelon diseases
June’s rainfall increased the potential for diseases to strike south Georgia watermelon fields, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts.
The 'Oakhurst' pineapple lily sports burgundy blushes. CAES News
Pineapple lily is easy to grow, exotically beautiful
With blooms that resemble a pineapple, the tropical-looking pineapple lily partners well with canna lilies, bananas and upright elephant ears. It also looks at home with ornamental grasses swaying in the breeze, partnered with drifts of flowers.
Cotton being harvested. CAES News
Cotton farmers need to be wary of diseases like target spot and bacterial blight
In addition to root-knot nematodes and target spot disease, Georgia cotton farmers should be prepared to fight bacterial blight, said University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait.
Fusarium wilt is a fungal disease that can considerably damage a watermelon crop. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether fusarium wilt can be managed through fumigation. CAES News
Fumigation a potential management tool for Georgia watermelon farmers fighting fusarium wilt disease
Fusarium wilt is on the rise in Georgia watermelon fields. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether this fungal disease can be managed through fumigation.
Black shank disease badly affected this tobacco field in Coffee County, Georgia. CAES News
New tobacco varieties could reduce levels of black shank disease
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension research trials of new tobacco varieties could help farmers reduce the level of black shank disease in their fields to 15 percent, according to Tony Barnes, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension agent in Atkinson County, Georgia.
The UGA Tifton campus released the 'Cowboy' perennial peanut, which produces robust, yellow blooms. CAES News
UGA-bred 'Cowboy' perennial plant offers color, nitrogen to homeowner's lawn
The University of Georgia-bred ‘Cowboy’ perennial peanut plant doesn’t produce edible peanuts, but this new cultivar offers homeowners a colorful addition to ornamental beds and a supplemental source of nitrogen for surrounding grasses.
Representing a broad cross section of corporations, businesses and organizations throughout Georgia, 25 professionals have been chosen to participate in the Advancing Georgia's Leaders in Agriculture and Forestry (AGL) 2015-2017 class. CAES News
Advancing Georgia's Leaders in Agriculture and Forestry 2017-2019 class announced
Twenty-five professionals who represent a broad cross section of corporations, businesses and organizations throughout Georgia have been chosen to participate in the Advancing Georgia’s Leaders in Agriculture and Forestry (AGL) 2017-2019 class.
A yellow squash matures on the vine of a squash plant growing in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
Weather and pests can make summer squash a frustrating crop for home gardeners
Pests and diseases make summer squash one of the most challenging vegetables to grow in Georgia home gardens, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Elizabeth Little, who studies plant diseases and control methods at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
There are two basic types of aerification, hollow and solid tine. With hollow tine a soil core is removed, while with solid tine aerification a hole is created and no core is removed. With both types, a void in the soil is created that allows air and water to more deeply penetrate the root zone. The aeration benefits are longer lasting with hollow tine (pictured) due to the removal of the core. CAES News
Turfgrass will benefit from aerification
Last year many lawns across the state didn’t receive enough rainfall for the grass to grow, photosynthesize and make carbohydrate reserves. Turfgrass that experienced this lack of rainfall will likely be slow to green up this spring. If rainfall totals return to normal this spring, lawns will recover, but they may do so at a slower rate because the production of reserves was compromised last fall. For example, a lawn that would typically be fully green and growing in mid-May might take until late May or June to green up. A two- to four-week delay in green-up of warm-season grasses may be common this spring.