Georgia 4-H

What is Georgia 4-H?

Georgia 4-H helps youth to acquire knowledge, develop life skills and form attitudes that will enable them to become self-directive and productive members of society. The program sets the stage for youth and adults to learn, grow and work together as catalysts for positive change.

Mission

Georgia 4-H has a mission to assist youth in acquiring knowledge, developing life skills and forming attitudes that will enable them to become self-directing, productive and contributing members of society. This mission is accomplished through hands-on learning experiences and a focus on agricultural and environmental issues, agriculture awareness, leadership, communication skills, foods and nutrition, health, energy conservation and citizenship.

Georgia 4-H is all about exploring and discovering, encouraging and challenging. As a program of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Cooperative Extension System, 4-H is part of the nationwide Extension network.

Members of 4-H are known for sharing their research-based knowledge and technology with others where they live and work. Georgia 4-H combines federal, state, and local expertise and resources.

Environmental Education

Environmental education programs are administered by UGA Cooperative Extension at six 4-H centers across the state.

These programs offer teachers and students a combination of resources in the forms of nature and equipment to aid in the learning process. Programs can be customized to meet specific objectives as requested by visiting schools.

Program Objectives

  • To develop an awareness, knowledge and appreciation for the natural environment
  • To cultivate curiosity, critical reasoning and evaluation skills
  • To develop positive relationships between students and their teachers
  • To make the school program more meaningful by applying knowledge and skills required in the classroom to real-life situations
  • To provide experiences in scientific processes, such as observing, measuring, classifying, etc.
  • To develop self-confidence and physical fitness
  • To develop an appreciation for the local and natural history of an area

4-H Youth Development News

Members of Well Connected Communities work together to improve health in their communities. CAES News
UGA Extension builds local coalitions through Well Connected Communities
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents throughout the state have been hard at work improving health in their communities through the Well Connected Communities program. A nationwide initiative developed by the Cooperative Extension System and the National 4-H Council, Well Connected Communities is designed to identify and address systemic health inequities at the local level.
4-H Tech Changemakers address the digital divide between young people and senior citizens by providing education on common technological devices, assisting with one-on-one support, and helping with online activities. In this photo, Houston County 4-H Tech Changemaker Leilani Priest-Akens addresses 130 university leaders at a regional conference discussing new tech survey resources. (Photo by Josie Smith) CAES News
4-H Tech Changemakers help adults develop digital literacy skills
Youth involved with the Georgia 4-H Tech Changemakers program are bridging the digital divide and providing digital literacy education to improve workforce readiness skills in adults. The 2021-22 cohort surpassed previous record impact numbers by reaching 5,488 adults during the program year, working cooperatively to plan, implement and evaluate needs-driven educational programming in their local communities.
A young student in the Georgia 4-H Environmental Education program reaches out to gently pat a turtle at a Georgia 4-H center. CAES News
Georgia 4-H offers students a natural wonderland
A math teacher and a gym coach take long steps down to the sandy ground from the bottom stairs of two yellow school buses. It is still early March, but the air is already warm and sticky; a gentle breeze stirs the Spanish moss that droops from live oak trees above their heads. An instant later, 64 middle-school students pile out of the buses and take in their surroundings at Burton 4-H Center on Tybee Island.