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University of Georgia Regents' Professor Michael R. Strand has received one of the highest honors a scientist can receive — election to the National Academy of Sciences. CAES News
University of Georgia Regents' Professor Michael R. Strand has received one of the highest honors a scientist can receive — election to the National Academy of Sciences.
Entomologist Michael Strand named inaugural H.M. Pulliam Chair in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
Professor Michael Strand has dedicated his career to unlocking the power of basic science to improve agriculture, and that dedication has earned him the recognition of the state’s agricultural community.
Temperatures ranged from 3 to 7 degrees above normal across Georgia during October 2019. Despite the heat, above-average rainfall helped ease drought conditions across the state. CAES News
Temperatures ranged from 3 to 7 degrees above normal across Georgia during October 2019. Despite the heat, above-average rainfall helped ease drought conditions across the state.
October ushered in autumn with summer-like temperatures and some drought relief
October saw the easing of drought conditions across the state, but many producers reported that the months of dry conditions had already harmed their crops.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
UGA scientists receive grants to study ambrosia beetles
Research entomologists in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are using three grants to study ambrosia beetles in an effort to prevent future attacks and preserve more fruit and nut trees.
Precision agriculture researcher and UGA Professor George Vellidis works with graduate student Anna Orfanou on checking the circuit board of a UGA Smart Sensor Array node. CAES News
Precision agriculture researcher and UGA Professor George Vellidis works with graduate student Anna Orfanou on checking the circuit board of a UGA Smart Sensor Array node.
Farming for the future: UGA leads the way in precision agriculture
The University of Georgia was among the first academic institutions to delve into precision agriculture when it emerged in the mid-1990s. A quarter-century later, UGA is stepping up efforts to expand its faculty, curriculum, research and outreach to again become a leader in the field.
The University of Georgia has received a $14 million grant from the U.S. Agency of International Development to manage the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Research, known as the “Peanut Lab,” a global peanut research program that works to alleviate hunger by helping farmers in developing countries grow healthy crops. The agreement builds on UGA and USAID's long-standing partnership on global peanut research, which dates back to the 1980s. CAES News
The University of Georgia has received a $14 million grant from the U.S. Agency of International Development to manage the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Research, known as the “Peanut Lab,” a global peanut research program that works to alleviate hunger by helping farmers in developing countries grow healthy crops. The agreement builds on UGA and USAID's long-standing partnership on global peanut research, which dates back to the 1980s.
UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences to host Global Food Security Summit on Nov. 8
For the past decade, demographers have predicted that the world would have to double its food supply by 2050 to feed the growing population.
From right, UGA-Tifton Assistant Dean Joe West, UGA Provost S. Jack Hu and Tidewater representatives pose for a picture in front of one of the tractors donated to UGA-Tifton this fall. CAES News
From right, UGA-Tifton Assistant Dean Joe West, UGA Provost S. Jack Hu and Tidewater representatives pose for a picture in front of one of the tractors donated to UGA-Tifton this fall.
Local equipment company partners with University of Georgia Tifton campus
A partnership between Tidewater Equipment Company and the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has led to the UGA Tifton campus receiving two tractors to aid with field research this fall.
Blueberries are about to be harvested in this 2015 file photo on a UGA farm in Alapaha, Georgia. CAES News
Blueberries are about to be harvested in this 2015 file photo on a UGA farm in Alapaha, Georgia.
Georgia Farm Bureau supplies grant for UGA-Tifton plant pathologist to study blueberry disease
A plant pathologist at the University of Georgia Tifton campus is using a grant from the Georgia Farm Bureau to study a bacterial disease that is harming the state’s blueberry crops. 
‘Orange Bulldog’ is an improved pumpkin variety developed by UGA scientists from germplasm collected in the jungles of South America. It has greater levels of resistance to viruses than conventional pumpkins. ‘Orange Bulldog’ made its debut in 2004 and has consistently produced yields of 13,000 to 20,000 pounds per acre in north and south Georgia. CAES News
‘Orange Bulldog’ is an improved pumpkin variety developed by UGA scientists from germplasm collected in the jungles of South America. It has greater levels of resistance to viruses than conventional pumpkins. ‘Orange Bulldog’ made its debut in 2004 and has consistently produced yields of 13,000 to 20,000 pounds per acre in north and south Georgia.
Pumpkins are for carving, eating and decorating
Georgia farmers devote about 900 acres to growing pumpkins — technically a squash and a cousin to the cucumber. Most Georgia-grown pumpkins come from the northernmost part of the state where the climate is cooler and there is less disease pressure. UGA-bred ‘Orange Bulldog' is disease resistant.
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well. CAES News
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well.
Center for Produce Safety funds UGA food science produce safety research
Three University of Georgia food scientists are among the recipients of grants awarded by the Center for Produce Safety (CPS) as part of its $2.7 million program. The grants will fund projects focused on food safety issues related to fruits and vegetables. 
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