News

Soybeans grow on a plant at a UGA lab in Athens. Soybean farmers will soon have a smart phone app to help know when to irrigate their crop. CAES News
Soybeans grow on a plant at a UGA lab in Athens. Soybean farmers will soon have a smart phone app to help know when to irrigate their crop.
Organic practices to increase soybean nutrients could benefit farmers in developing countries
In developing countries, the sustainable production of nutrient-dense crops is a critical need. A team of University of Georgia researchers have identified an affordable and local organic practice that can increase nutrient density in soybeans, or edamame, and improve soil health.
A survey conducted by UGA researchers examined whether respondents had any concern about the growing of hemp and the creation of hemp products in their area. CAES News
A survey conducted by UGA researchers examined whether respondents had any concern about the growing of hemp and the creation of hemp products in their area.
Examining issues facing hemp production and processing
Hemp is a promising new industry for profitability, but growers of this newly legal crop will face a mix of public opinions according to University of Georgia research into challenges those in the hemp business may face in the southeastern United States.
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas. CAES News
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas.
UGA citrus trials support growing industry in Georgia
Ongoing citrus rootstock trials being conducted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in Lowndes County hold promise for increased yields, improved fruit quality and greater disease resistance.
Robin Buell will join the University of Georgia in fall 2021 as its newest Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. (photo courtesy of MSU) CAES News
Robin Buell will join the University of Georgia in fall 2021 as its newest Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. (photo courtesy of MSU)
Plant genomicist Buell to join UGA as Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar
Robin Buell, University Distinguished Professor at Michigan State University and a renowned plant genomics expert, will join the University of Georgia in fall 2021 as its newest Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar.
The Georgia Foundation for Agriculture, Georgia Farm Bureau, Georgia Department of Agriculture and UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development are jointly sponsoring a second survey to document the impact of COVID-19 on the agriculture industry in the state. (photo from Georgia Farm Bureau) CAES News
The Georgia Foundation for Agriculture, Georgia Farm Bureau, Georgia Department of Agriculture and UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development are jointly sponsoring a second survey to document the impact of COVID-19 on the agriculture industry in the state. (photo from Georgia Farm Bureau)
Deadline extended: year-end economic survey now open to Georgia farmers
A survey is now being conducted by the University of Georgia in an effort to get a year-end perspective of the impact of the pandemic on Georgia’s agricultural industry.
Natural predators from turf lawns were placed in petri dishes where the marks made by the insects were preserved in soft clay. CAES News
Natural predators from turf lawns were placed in petri dishes where the marks made by the insects were preserved in soft clay.
Clay models track the activity of beneficial insects in turfgrass
Modeling clay isn’t limited to art classrooms and sculpting studios. University of Georgia researchers developed a tool to track beneficial insects in turfgrass systems using clay models. Tracking these good predators can help develop eco-friendly pest management techniques for both home lawns and commercial sod growers.
Schematic representation of the secretion pathways of plant CLE peptides and their mimicry injected by nematodes into the plant cell cytoplasm.— © New Phytologist CAES News
Schematic representation of the secretion pathways of plant CLE peptides and their mimicry injected by nematodes into the plant cell cytoplasm.— © New Phytologist
Invisible pest causes more than $1 billion in crop losses by taking control of plants’ natural processes
A newly published study led by researchers from the University of Georgia and several partner institutions reveals a discovery that could lead to new control strategies for a tiny-but-persistent agricultural pest that causes enormous soybean losses.
An eight-year-old Momi fir in a test plot on the UGA Griffin campus that is part of research by Mark Czarnota and his team to develop a heat-resistant, disease-resistant fir species for the Christmas tree, ornamental and timber industries. CAES News
An eight-year-old Momi fir in a test plot on the UGA Griffin campus that is part of research by Mark Czarnota and his team to develop a heat-resistant, disease-resistant fir species for the Christmas tree, ornamental and timber industries.
A Southern fir Christmas tree is on the horizon for ornamental and timber industries
During the holiday season in the U.S., more than 20 million freshly cut Christmas trees are sold every year, with fir trees topping the most-desired list. Unfortunately growers cannot meet the needs of consumers, and every year, there is a shortage of trees, primarily due to the incredible losses of susceptible firs — including balsam, Fraser, Canaan and others — to the root fungus Phytophthora.
Blossom-end rot, which manifests in the first few weeks of growth after tomato flowers are pollinated, causes black, rotted areas on the blossom end of the fruit, opposite the stem. CAES News
Blossom-end rot, which manifests in the first few weeks of growth after tomato flowers are pollinated, causes black, rotted areas on the blossom end of the fruit, opposite the stem.
Getting to the bottom of blossom-end rot
Home gardeners and commercial farmers alike can attest to the disappointment of seeing a beautiful tomato ripening on a vine, only to discover that the fruit has dark, sunken pits at the blossom end of the fruit. Called blossom-end rot (BER), this physiological disorder is prevalent in fruit and vegetable crops, including tomatoes, and can cause severe economic losses.