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‘Orange Bulldog’ is an improved pumpkin variety developed by UGA scientists from germplasm collected in the jungles of South America. It has greater levels of resistance to viruses than conventional pumpkins. ‘Orange Bulldog’ made its debut in 2004 and has consistently produced yields of 13,000 to 20,000 pounds per acre in north and south Georgia. CAES News
‘Orange Bulldog’ is an improved pumpkin variety developed by UGA scientists from germplasm collected in the jungles of South America. It has greater levels of resistance to viruses than conventional pumpkins. ‘Orange Bulldog’ made its debut in 2004 and has consistently produced yields of 13,000 to 20,000 pounds per acre in north and south Georgia.
Pumpkins are for carving, eating and decorating
Georgia farmers devote about 900 acres to growing pumpkins — technically a squash and a cousin to the cucumber. Most Georgia-grown pumpkins come from the northernmost part of the state where the climate is cooler and there is less disease pressure. UGA-bred ‘Orange Bulldog' is disease resistant.
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well. CAES News
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well.
Center for Produce Safety funds UGA food science produce safety research
Three University of Georgia food scientists are among the recipients of grants awarded by the Center for Produce Safety (CPS) as part of its $2.7 million program. The grants will fund projects focused on food safety issues related to fruits and vegetables. 
Georgia Farm Bureau President Gerald Long (center) announced the recipients of the GFB Harvest 20 Research Grants at the GFB Commodity Conference on Aug. 8. University of Georgia faculty who were awarded grants are (l-r) Lawton Stewart, Govindaraj Dev Kumar, Angelita Acebes, Sudeep Bag, Jonathan Oliver and (not pictured) Bhabesh Dutta and Mark Freeman. CAES News
Georgia Farm Bureau President Gerald Long (center) announced the recipients of the GFB Harvest 20 Research Grants at the GFB Commodity Conference on Aug. 8. University of Georgia faculty who were awarded grants are (l-r) Lawton Stewart, Govindaraj Dev Kumar, Angelita Acebes, Sudeep Bag, Jonathan Oliver and (not pictured) Bhabesh Dutta and Mark Freeman.
Georgia Farm Bureau awards $94,000 in grants to UGA scientists
The Georgia Farm Bureau (GFB) has awarded $94,000 in research grants to seven University of Georgia scientists and their research teams who are addressing production issues impacting Georgia farmers.
Some parts of Georgia saw temperatures as high as 8 or 9 degrees above normal during September 2019. The heat and abnormally dry weather left much the state in some stage of drought. CAES News
Some parts of Georgia saw temperatures as high as 8 or 9 degrees above normal during September 2019. The heat and abnormally dry weather left much the state in some stage of drought.
September was unseasonably hot, dry, UGA climatologist says
While it seems Georgia is finally seeing a break from the summer heat, the long hot summer, including a record-setting September, has already caused problems for many Georgia farmers.
Entomologist Bill Snyder studies how beneficial bacteria and fungi in the soil allow plants to protect themselves against plant-feeding insects and attract predatory insects to their defense. He also collaborates with farmers interested in learning more about beneficial insects, birds, or soil organisms on their farms. Snyder joined the University of Georgia in July. CAES News
Entomologist Bill Snyder studies how beneficial bacteria and fungi in the soil allow plants to protect themselves against plant-feeding insects and attract predatory insects to their defense. He also collaborates with farmers interested in learning more about beneficial insects, birds, or soil organisms on their farms. Snyder joined the University of Georgia in July.
New UGA entomologist studies beneficial biodiversity on farms
Bill Snyder, the newest researcher to join the University of Georgia Department of Entomology, is looking forward to working with the wide diversity of soils, climates and cropping systems in the Southeastern U.S.
Whiteflies transmit several devastating viruses to important vegetable crops, including squash. CAES News
Whiteflies transmit several devastating viruses to important vegetable crops, including squash.
UGA CAES part of extensive research study aimed at whitefly management
Researchers from three research institutions are using a $3.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fight whiteflies on vegetable crops.
Live from the Lab CAES News
Live from the Lab
UGA CAES launches fourth semester of Live from the Lab
Back for its fourth semester, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences' Live from the Lab series will be taking Georgians back inside the college's labs to talk to world-class researchers about their work.
UGA horticulture Professor Donglin Zhang shows a group around his greenhouse at the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville during a past farm tour. The 2019 Horticulture Farm Tour will be held on Oct. 4 at 1221 Hog Mountain Road. CAES News
UGA horticulture Professor Donglin Zhang shows a group around his greenhouse at the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville during a past farm tour. The 2019 Horticulture Farm Tour will be held on Oct. 4 at 1221 Hog Mountain Road.
UGA horticulturists to host ornamental open house at the Durham Horticulture Farm
Before they are available to the public, many new varieties of bushes and landscape plants are first planted at the University of Georgia’s Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia.
UGA mycologist Marin Brewer is using a recent USDA NIFA grant to continue her research of Aspergillus fumigatus, a fungus that is abundant in soil, compost and other organic debris. This fungus can cause serious lung infections in immunocompromised people. Michelle Momany, a professor in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Department of Plant Biology, is collaborating with Brewer on this study. CAES News
UGA mycologist Marin Brewer is using a recent USDA NIFA grant to continue her research of Aspergillus fumigatus, a fungus that is abundant in soil, compost and other organic debris. This fungus can cause serious lung infections in immunocompromised people. Michelle Momany, a professor in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Department of Plant Biology, is collaborating with Brewer on this study.
Grant funds UGA mycologist's study of fungus that affects humans
University of Georgia mycologist Marin Brewer has been awarded close to $500,000 from the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) to search for ways to detect antifungal resistance in a naturally occurring fungus and identify the factors that contribute to its resistance in agricultural environments.
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