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Species used to develop interspecific hybrid populations: (A) Asclepias tuberosa (mother), (B) A. curassavica, (C) A. fascicularis, (D) A. incarnata, (E) A. hirtella, (F) A. purpurascens, (G) A. syriaca, and (H) A. speciosa. (HortScience horts 56, 7) CAES News
UGA research on milkweed breeding featured on the cover of HortScience
The research, led by College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences doctoral candidate Mary Lewis and horticulture professor Matthew Chappell, focused on breeding a milkweed plant with commercially desirable traits that would support pollinators.
Assistant Professor Li Yang works in a controlled environment growth room for Arabidopsis thaliana research. CAES News
CAES researcher receives $1.75 million to study age-related disease resistance — and the molecular link between aging and immunity
Like people, plants face challenges from microbial pathogens throughout their lifespan. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has provided Li Yang, an assistant professor of plant immunity at the University of Georgia, with the Maximizing Investors’ Research Award (MIRA) totalling $1.75 million to continue his research on the molecular mechanisms of age-related resistance in plants.
Hemp is the same species as marijuana (Cannabis sativa), and the only difference is a legal one: Plants with less than 0.3% of the chemical that gives users a “high”— tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC — are hemp, and anything over 0.3% THC is marijuana. CAES News
Burgeoning hemp industry faces growing pains
When you buy something at the store, you have a pretty good idea of what you’re getting no matter where you buy it — a Coke is a Coke, Oreos are Oreos — and whether you buy them in Atlanta or Seattle doesn’t really change what you get. Farmers are in a similar position when they choose what to plant, but in the burgeoning field of industrial hemp, it turns out that things are much more complicated.
An official walks across the infield of the National Stadium in Tokyo, home of the 2020 Olympic Games. A UGA-bred grass will be used on the field. (Photo by PHILIP FONG/AFP via Getty Images) CAES News
Grass in the Olympic Stadium developed by UGA-Tifton
The Summer Olympics may be in Japan this year, but Team USA was on home turf when they took the field for today’s Opening Ceremony. The Japan National Stadium’s field is currently sodded with TifSport bermudagrass, developed in south Georgia. One of many grass varieties created and tested at the University of Georgia’s Tifton Campus, TifSport is a dense, medium- to fine-textured grass bred to withstand the high traffic sports fields see while tolerating herbicides.
Taija Stoner-Harris (left), a master's degree student in the Department of Food Science and Technology, helps principal investigator and doctoral candidate Linda Araghi process cantaloupes for a study finding new product uses for Georgia Grown cantaloupe. CAES News
Cantaloupe juice — the next big thing?
Summer in Georgia yields a bounty of fresh fruit and vegetables. In fact, Georgia is one of the top producers of cantaloupe in the U.S., and Georgia-grown watermelons and cantaloupes are the stars of summer grocery stores and farmers markets.
Jennifer Waldeck has joined the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences as head of the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication. CAES News
Jennifer Waldeck takes off as ALEC lead
Organizational and instructional communication specialist Jennifer Waldeck has been named head of the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication (ALEC) in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences beginning July 1. Waldeck most recently served as the associate dean for academic programming and faculty affairs for the School of Communication at Chapman University.
A water rescue crew searches for survivors in Texas after Hurricane Harvey, a devastating Category 4 hurricane that made landfall on Texas and Louisiana in August 2017, causing catastrophic flooding. CAES News
At-risk homeowners may forgo flood insurance
Fifteen million homes in the United States are at risk of flooding, according to the nonprofit First Street. And homes on the coasts aren’t the only properties at risk.
The colorful exhibit highlights the seasons in which various Georgia crops are harvested and some of the ways farmers use technology, such as apps and drones to monitor their crops for diseases or pests and to conserve water. The exhibit includes an interactive kiosk where students can explore games and videos featuring interviews with urban farmers in and around the Atlanta area. CAES News
New exhibit at Georgia Capitol Museum celebrates agriculture
Under the golden dome of the Georgia State Capitol, a new exhibit in the Georgia Capitol Museum shines a spotlight on agriculture in Georgia. The exhibit is designed to educate visitors on the importance of the state’s No. 1 industry.
Alfredo Espinoza-Martinez received the 2021 Excellence in Extension award from the American Phytopathological Society for his work in Extension focusing on disease management in turfgrass, as well as working with small grains and non-legume forages. CAES News
UGA professor earns award from American Phytopathological Society
It is said that if you find a job you love, you will never work a day in your life. For Alfredo Martinez-Espinoza, this has come true through his work as a plant pathologist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. His passion and hard work have been recognized with the American Phytopathological Society’s (APS) 2021 Excellence in Extension award.