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UGA poultry science researchers will study various potential contamination methods for SARS-CoV-2 in meat and poultry plants and what product-treatment methods can be used to mitigate the virus on food products. CAES News
UGA poultry science researchers will study various potential contamination methods for SARS-CoV-2 in meat and poultry plants and what product-treatment methods can be used to mitigate the virus on food products.
UGA faculty collaborate on evaluating COVID-19 control methods in meat processing
Poultry researchers at the University of Georgia are partnering with a team from Kansas State University to study how to effectively control the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the nation's meat and poultry processing facilities.
Huang's team will research cost-effective treatments to remove per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from water, wastewater and biosolids to ensure safe water for drinking and agricultural application. CAES News
Huang's team will research cost-effective treatments to remove per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from water, wastewater and biosolids to ensure safe water for drinking and agricultural application.
EPA awards UGA’s Huang nearly $1.6 million for pollutant research
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently awarded nearly $1.6 million in research funding to University of Georgia’s Jack Huang to research cost-effective treatments to remove per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from water, wastewater and biosolids to ensure safe water for drinking and agricultural application in rural areas. Huang, an associate professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences on the UGA Griffin campus, is one of only three researchers whose teams received funding from the EPA.
Fescue contains an endophyte — a fungus that lives within the plant — that gives the grass desirable attributes but produces alkaloids that are toxic to animals who graze on it, a defense mechanism meant to prevent overgrazing. Pictured are the slender tubes of the endophytic fungus (Neotyphodium coendophialum) in the intercellular spaces of tall fescue. CAES News
Fescue contains an endophyte — a fungus that lives within the plant — that gives the grass desirable attributes but produces alkaloids that are toxic to animals who graze on it, a defense mechanism meant to prevent overgrazing. Pictured are the slender tubes of the endophytic fungus (Neotyphodium coendophialum) in the intercellular spaces of tall fescue.
UGA researchers seek targets to mitigate fescue toxicity in cattle
A $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture will allow researchers at the University of Georgia to examine the minutiae of cattle and fescue microbiome interaction to find targets that will help mitigate the effects of fescue toxicosis, a forage-related condition that costs the U.S. beef industry more than $1 billion each year.
UGA's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has a fall 2020 undergraduate enrollment of 1,456, and a graduate/professional student enrollment of 624, its highest graduate enrollment to date. CAES News
UGA's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has a fall 2020 undergraduate enrollment of 1,456, and a graduate/professional student enrollment of 624, its highest graduate enrollment to date.
CAES ranked No. 2 college for agricultural sciences in U.S. by Niche
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has ranked second on the 2021 list of Best Colleges for Agricultural Sciences in America, up one spot from the 2020 ranking.   
Nick T. Place, an academic leader with a record of applying research-based expertise to the needs of agricultural producers and communities, has been named dean of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and director of UGA Cooperative Extension and the Agricultural Experiment Stations. CAES News
Nick T. Place, an academic leader with a record of applying research-based expertise to the needs of agricultural producers and communities, has been named dean of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and director of UGA Cooperative Extension and the Agricultural Experiment Stations.
Nick T. Place named dean and director of UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
Nick T. Place, an academic leader with a record of applying research-based expertise to the needs of agricultural producers and communities, has been named dean of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and director of UGA Cooperative Extension and Agricultural Experiment Stations.
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well. CAES News
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well.
A new method may make tomatoes safer to eat
When vegetable farmers harvest crops, they often rely on postharvest washing to reduce any foodborne pathogens, but a new University of Georgia study shows promise in reducing these pathogens — as well as lowering labor costs — by applying sanitizers to produce while it is still in the fields.
Pecan scab fungus (Fusicladium effusum) is the most destructive disease of pecans in Georgia. CAES News
Pecan scab fungus (Fusicladium effusum) is the most destructive disease of pecans in Georgia.
UGA to begin new pecan variety trials in southeast Georgia
University of Georgia researchers will begin a series of trials this winter to help identify better management practices for pecan growers in Georgia.
Smith posing with a bird and a research sample. CAES News
Smith posing with a bird and a research sample.
New research reconciles wild bird conservation with farm food safety concerns
Following the onset of several major outbreaks of foodborne pathogens traced back to wildlife, buyers of farm-fresh produce began encouraging the removal of natural habitats and nesting areas on farms to discourage wildlife intrusion.
Grasshopper (file photo by Sharon Dowdy) CAES News
Grasshopper (file photo by Sharon Dowdy)
‘Insect apocalypse’ may not be happening in U.S.
Scientists have been warning about an “insect apocalypse” in recent years, noting sharp declines in specific areas — particularly in Europe. A new study shows these warnings may have been exaggerated and are not representative of what’s happening to insects on a larger scale.
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