News

Plant genetics research at the University of Georgia spans schools, departments, disciplines, and centers. From the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) to Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, the Plant Center to the Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics & Genomics and more, UGA faculty with genetics expertise are seeking plant-based solutions to societal challenges. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker) CAES News
How UGA plant geneticists are tackling the climate crisis
With record-breaking temperatures and extreme weather escalating, the threats posed by climate change are intensifying — but the plants of tomorrow could help us meet the massive challenges of our warming planet. Plant genetics research at the University of Georgia spans schools, departments, disciplines and centers. From the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences to Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, UGA faculty with genetics expertise are seeking plant-based solutions to societal challenges.
Researchers in UGA’s Regenerative Bioscience Center harness the body’s natural healing ability and turn it up to 11. CAES News
Rebuilding the brain
In most respects, May 6, 2022, was a typical school day for Amy Paulk Grist. Tift County High School buzzed with end-of-the-year activities. Tift County is the only high school serving Tifton, Georgia, a mostly rural community off I-75, just an hour north of the Florida border. A veteran economics teacher of more than a decade, Amy was wrapping up another successful year at the high school of nearly 2,300 students when her vision started to blur. Something wasn’t right.
A new study from the USDA Agricultural Research Service and UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has found that pearl millet, an annual grass suited for conditions in the Southeast U.S., is a good food source for some pollinators. CAES News
Pearl millet wins approval from honey bees and other pollinators
Pearl millet, an annual grass used for grain and forage, can be a good food source for honey bees and hover flies, according to a recent study. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service and University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers studied the impact of pearl millet as a source of insect food by surveying insects collecting and consuming the sucrose-rich pollen of this crop.
McHugh on Sapelo May 2024 web CAES News
CAES entomologist named distinguished professor for work in insect biodiversity
For Joseph McHugh, a career as an entomologist was never in question: He became fascinated by insects and their diversity in grade school and his passion never wavered. This year, his internationally recognized leadership in the field he loves was rewarded as he was named the Herbert H. and Jean A. Ross Memorial Distinguished Professor of Insect Systematics and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
CAES UGA GrandFarm SiteVisit May 2024 SeanMontgomery 17 Web CAES News
UGA and Grand Farm announce agriculture innovation partnership in Perry, Georgia
Situated on 250 acres in Perry, Georgia, next to the Georgia National Fairgrounds and Agricenter and at the heart of the state's agricultural landscape, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Grand Farm are coming together to build the University of Georgia Grand Farm, a working innovation farm with plans to deploy the first field projects in 2025.
A team of researchers at CFS, led by director Francisco Diez, studied the potential uses of antimicrobial blue light to eliminate pathogens in manufacturing facilities. CAES News
CAES researchers ensure a safer global food supply
In 2018, the United Nations General Assembly established June 7 as World Food Safety Day to bring awareness of foodborne risks and “to celebrate the myriad benefits of safe food.” With 25 faculty members involved in food safety microbiology, the University of Georgia has one of the largest teams of food safety researchers of any university. Their research and collaboration efforts contribute to a growing body of knowledge that ensures producers and consumers have the latest information about food safety.
A new grant program focusing on preventing and reducing food loss and waste is designed to help reduce food waste in the U.S. by 50% over the next five years. CAES News
Southern SARE grant program seeks best practices on preventing food loss and waste
A new national grant program administered by the Southern Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program will pump more than $10.2 million into research to address food loss and waste in the region. Supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, the SARE Community Foods Project Food Loss and Waste Training and Technical Assistance Grants Program is seeking grant proposals from applicants working in the public sector on food loss and waste prevention.
John Ruter in the UGA Trial Gardens CAES News
Research and beauty collide at the Trial Gardens
Visual beauty meets functional research at the University of Georgia Trial Gardens. Located on South Campus, the gardens are home to seeds and plants from nearly every plant breeding company worldwide, grown to service UGA research, teaching and new crop introduction. “The Trial Gardens are the premier campus test site in the southeast for the evaluation of commercial bedding plants and perennials,” said John Ruter, the Trial Gardens director and Allan M. Armitage Professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Brian Schwartz at UGA-Tifton CAES News
New ‘Tif3D’ turfgrass promises superior putting-green performance
After nearly a decade of research trials, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences turfgrass breeder Brian Schwartz and a dedicated team of colleagues and industry partners released a cutting-edge bermudagrass variety called ‘Tif3D’ earlier this year. ‘Tif3D’ is a specialty grass developed specifically for putting greens and boasts the unparalleled performance and playability putting greens require, said Schwartz, a professor in the CAES Department of Crop and Soil Sciences.