Areas of Exploration

Agricultural and environmental research is foundational in the land-grant university mission – education for everyone, research for scientifically based decisions and extension outreach to help ensure scientifically based agriculture in practiced in America.

Agricultural and environmental research has three parts:

  • basic, which provides the discoveries for solution to the unknown problems of tomorrow;
  • applied, which uses the solutions of past basic research to address the problems of today; and 
  • directed, which delivers immediate actions to improve our agricultural systems.

We need all three for a healthy agriculture industry and to sustain the environment. At the University of Georgia, we excel at all three, and deliver a $144.4 million boost to Georgia’s economy.


AES research at UGA delivers a $144.4 million boost to Georgia's economy.
Discover Our Impact

Research News

UGA plant pathologist Bhabesh Dutta examines onion seedlings in research facilities on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
New “onion devourer” bacteria found by UGA researchers
University of Georgia researchers have identified a new species of bacteria, which they have named Pseudomonas alliivorans — from “allium vorans,” which translates as onion devourer or eater.
Taking part in the groundbreaking were, from left, Ryan Nesbit, Kelly Kerner, Kathy Pharr, Rahul Shrivastav, Provost S. Jack Hu, Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black, President Jere W. Morehead, Gov. Brian Kemp, Marty Kemp, Nick Place, Kylie Bruce, Regent Everett Kennedy, Regent Philip Wilheit, Jennifer Frum, Arthur Tripp and Toby Carr. (Photo by Peter Frey/UGA) CAES News
UGA breaks ground on new Poultry Science Complex
The University of Georgia broke ground Monday on the site of a new, technologically advanced Poultry Science Complex in Athens. The project will dramatically increase capacity for instruction, research and collaboration supporting Georgia’s multibillion-dollar poultry industry, the largest sector of the state’s No. 1 agriculture and agribusiness industry.
(Illustration by Daniel Rouhani/ExonScientific) CAES News
Shoring up the species barrier
In the latter months of 2019, a novel coronavirus probably leaped from a yet-unknown animal in central China into a human. Some speculate that SARS-CoV-2 leaked from a laboratory in Wuhan, China. But evidence suggests that it’s far more likely that the virus was a natural “zoonotic” leap from animal to human. The resulting COVID-19 pandemic has killed hundreds of thousands of Americans, including more than 23,000 Georgians, and mutated into dangerous new variants.