Areas of Exploration

Agricultural and environmental research is foundational in the land-grant university mission – education for everyone, research for scientifically based decisions and extension outreach to help ensure scientifically based agriculture in practiced in America.

Agricultural and environmental research has three parts:

  • basic, which provides the discoveries for solution to the unknown problems of tomorrow;
  • applied, which uses the solutions of past basic research to address the problems of today; and 
  • directed, which delivers immediate actions to improve our agricultural systems.

We need all three for a healthy agriculture industry and to sustain the environment. At the University of Georgia, we excel at all three, and deliver a $144.4 million boost to Georgia’s economy.


AES research at UGA delivers a $144.4 million boost to Georgia's economy.
Discover Our Impact

Research News

Resized Allison holds up a leaf of Saccharina latissima or sugar kelp amidst a dense population of wild seaweed in Plougeurneau France. Allison joined in on this field work in which a PhD student studying red seaweed was collecting data CAES News
CAES student works to revolutionize seaweed industry
When you hear the word agriculture, seaweed might not be the first thing that comes to mind. But Allison Fortner, a University of Georgia (UGA) doctoral student pursuing a degree in the Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication department (ALEC), is doing her part to help raise the profile of this important marine species.
George Vellidis, a professor in the department of crop and soil sciences and University Professor, reviews surface water runoff data with students at the UGA Tifton campus. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA) CAES News
UGA establishes Institute for Integrative Precision Agriculture
The University of Georgia is leveraging faculty expertise and strengthening industry ties through a new Institute for Integrative Precision Agriculture whose research and outreach will help sustainably feed a growing global population.
iStock 1281888457 (1) CAES News
New UGA study will look to lettuce microbes for food safety solutions
Often referred to as leafy greens, lettuce and other similar vegetables are a common source of foodborne illnesses. The contamination of lettuce with Escherichia coli O157:H7, also known as EcO157, has been a grave concern for decades.