Areas of Exploration

Agricultural and environmental research is foundational in the land-grant university mission – education for everyone, research for scientifically based decisions and extension outreach to help ensure scientifically based agriculture in practiced in America.

Agricultural and environmental research has three parts:

  • basic, which provides the discoveries for solution to the unknown problems of tomorrow;
  • applied, which uses the solutions of past basic research to address the problems of today; and 
  • directed, which delivers immediate actions to improve our agricultural systems.

We need all three for a healthy agriculture industry and to sustain the environment. At the University of Georgia, we excel at all three, and deliver a $144.4 million boost to Georgia’s economy.


AES research at UGA delivers a $144.4 million boost to Georgia's economy.
Discover Our Impact

Research News

Robin Buell, GRA Eminent Scholar Chair in Crop Genomics, works in a plant growth chamber. Buell received nearly $800,000 in funding to study the genome of tepary bean in an effort to address climate-related difficulties faces in production of common bean. CAES News
UGA genomicist seeks to offset climate impacts on important food crop
The common bean — which includes many varieties of dry beans, from navy and black beans to red, pinto and green beans — are an important nutritional source for many world populations. However, rapidly changing climate conditions are making them increasingly difficult to grow in many locations due to high temperatures and susceptibility to diseases and pests.
Palmer amaranth can reach heights of up to 7-10 feet. UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko encourages farmers to continue to control Palmer amaranth even after their corn is harvested. CAES News
UGA Extension tests peanut herbicide for 2023 registration
Peanuts, although a major crop in Georgia, are a minor crop in the U.S., with only about 1.5 million acres planted — versus approximately 90 million acres each of field corn and soybeans. Due to its limited acreage, there are not many herbicides solely developed for peanuts by major agrichemical companies. Unfortunately, emerging herbicide resistance problems in pernicious weeds like Palmer amaranth are of increasing concern in peanut-producing states and growers need more tools to combat these weeds.
As the inaugural class of Rising Scholars, ten Fort Valley State University students have spent the summer on UGA's Athens campus conducting research in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Inaugural class of Rising Scholars spends summer conducting research with CAES
In a lab on the bottom floor of the Miller Plant Sciences building, Dakota Walker pulled a sample of plant tissue to further examine gene expression under the microscope — an experience she never foresaw having at the University of Georgia, having originally applied to Fort Valley State University as a marketing major.