Areas of Exploration

Agricultural and environmental research is foundational in the land-grant university mission – education for everyone, research for scientifically based decisions and extension outreach to help ensure scientifically based agriculture in practiced in America.

Agricultural and environmental research has three parts:

  • basic, which provides the discoveries for solution to the unknown problems of tomorrow;
  • applied, which uses the solutions of past basic research to address the problems of today; and 
  • directed, which delivers immediate actions to improve our agricultural systems.

We need all three for a healthy agriculture industry and to sustain the environment. At the University of Georgia, we excel at all three, and deliver a $144.4 million boost to Georgia’s economy.


AES research at UGA delivers a $144.4 million boost to Georgia's economy.
Discover Our Impact

Research News

From designing more inclusive agricultural education to developing her brand, Kristen Dunning does it her way. CAES News
Setting the course
Since landing at the University of Georgia in 2018, Kristen Dunning has been building opportunities. While at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, she has become a student leader and researcher, started a successful personal care products business, and developed an idea to make the industry she loves more transparent in its history and more equitable in its future.
UGA Extension's new Master Forager program is now open for registrants in the Griffin, Georgia, area. CAES News
Train to become a Master Forager through UGA Extension
The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s novel Master Forager program has spots available for curious Georgians interested in learning how to safely harvest and use herbs, fungi and more. The first class for the program, which begins Aug. 24, will be held at the UGA Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia.
Researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering are developing a new way to detect potentially deadly Listeria contamination in food. CAES News
Researchers introduce rapid diagnostic test for Listeria
Researchers at the University of Georgia are developing a new way to detect potentially deadly Listeria contamination in food. Listeriosis, an infection caused by eating food contaminated by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, can cause severe illness in pregnant women, newborns, the elderly and people with compromised immune systems.