Areas of Exploration

Agricultural and environmental research is foundational in the land-grant university mission – education for everyone, research for scientifically based decisions and extension outreach to help ensure scientifically based agriculture in practiced in America.

Agricultural and environmental research has three parts:

  • basic, which provides the discoveries for solution to the unknown problems of tomorrow;
  • applied, which uses the solutions of past basic research to address the problems of today; and 
  • directed, which delivers immediate actions to improve our agricultural systems.

We need all three for a healthy agriculture industry and to sustain the environment. At the University of Georgia, we excel at all three, and deliver a $144.4 million boost to Georgia’s economy.


AES research at UGA delivers a $144.4 million boost to Georgia's economy.
Discover Our Impact

Research News

The Joro Watch team is pursuing a number of approaches to Joro spider research, looking into their impact on native species — like pollinators and native spiders — habitat, lifecycle and management. To help facilitate more conclusive research, UGA experts ask that the public help gather critical data by monitoring spider populations in the environment. (Photo by Carly Mirabile) CAES News
Joro Watch engages citizen-scientists to study future of Joro spiders
They have been described as palm-sized, parachuting creatures with the potential to spread up the East Coast. Now dozens of webs are appearing in trees, on fences and in gardens around the Southeast, and social media and message boards are buzzing with Joro spider sightings. Discussions of eradication methods ranging from chemical sprays to “Joro sticks” are rampant. Joro season is here.
Franklin West (left) and Steven Stice of UGA’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have received $1.1 million in grants from the National Institutes of Health to study potential treatments for traumatic brain injury. CAES News
Regenerative Bioscience team receives NIH support for TBI research
Two faculty members in UGA’s Regenerative Bioscience Center, Steven Stice and Franklin West, have been awarded multiple grants from the National Institutes of Health totaling $1.1 million to study potential treatments for traumatic brain injury. Stice and West will collaborate with MRI expert Qun Zhao to evaluate the brain’s functional organization and neural repair of networks following traumatic brain injury.
A bee on a flower in the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia. (UGA file photo) CAES News
Diverse landscapes at the heart of bee conservation
New research from the University of Georgia revealed that mixed land use — such as developments interspersed with forest patches — improves bee diversity and is leading to new solutions for bee conservation. UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers found that small amounts of development actually had a positive impact on the number of bee species present in a given area.