Vidalia Onion and Vegetable

Our Work and Purpose

The Vidalia Onion and Vegetable Research Center is located between Reidsville and Lyons in Toombs County on Highways 178 and 147. The facility is administered in five buildings on 3 acres of land owned by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Two 11-acre tracts on a long-term lease from the Georgia Forestry Commission provide researchers and staff land to conduct studies and educational demonstrations.

The center was established in 1999 primarily to provide research on Vidalia onions, and 6-7 acres of research plots have been devoted to this crop every year.

Researchers have developed a new pumpkin variety here that will enable south Georgia farmers to grow pumpkins commercially for the first time. In addition, fertility studies and variety trials have been conducted in corn, squash, cucumbers and pumpkins. Blackberries, strawberries, carrots, Brassica crops, garlic, shallots and artichokes have also been studied here, along with no-till and organic vegetable production and composting demonstrations.


Area Agent

Christopher Todd Tyson Area Onion Agent
Southeast District Vidalia Onion & Vegetable Research Center

Facility Location 


Vidalia Onion and Vegetable Research Center
8163 Highway 178
Lyons, GA 30436

Vidalia Onion News

Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
Stored properly Vidalia onions can still be around this winter
Georgia-grown Vidalia onions have hit the grocery and farmers market shelves. Farmers have been careful to handle the crop with kid gloves during the harvest. Now, consumers have to make sure to store them properly for long-term use.
Onion center rot is a devastating disease for Vidalia onion producers in south Georgia. CAES News
Postharvest diseases a concern for onion producers
With Georgia’s Vidalia onion harvest approaching, growers must prepare to protect their crops from diseases during storage, according to Tim Coolong, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist.
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
UGA onion agent tells Georgia farmers to be proactive with fungicides
Georgia’s Vidalia onion crop is planted and looks “promising,” according to Chris Tyson, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s area onion agent, but he cautions producers to be proactive in managing onion diseases.