Precision agriculture researcher and UGA Professor George Vellidis works with graduate student Anna Orfanou on checking the circuit board of a UGA Smart Sensor Array node. CAES News
Precision agriculture researcher and UGA Professor George Vellidis works with graduate student Anna Orfanou on checking the circuit board of a UGA Smart Sensor Array node.
George Vellidis named University Professor
George Vellidis, professor in the department of crop and soil sciences in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has been named University Professor, a title bestowed on those who have had a significant impact on the university in addition to fulfilling their normal academic responsibilities.
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm.
Stock food and water supplies in preparation for emergencies
News of the coronavirus has many people feeling uneasy and helpless. Building a supply of emergency food and water is a task University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say will help Georgians prepare for any kind of emergency, be it a medical quarantine, a snowstorm or a major power outage.
4-H'ers listen to planting instructions from a Master Gardener at the new GROWL Fulton County Demonstration and Teaching Garden located at the Camp Fulton-Truitt office in College Park, Georgia. CAES News
4-H'ers listen to planting instructions from a Master Gardener at the new GROWL Fulton County Demonstration and Teaching Garden located at the Camp Fulton-Truitt office in College Park, Georgia.
Project GROWL garden opens rental plots to the community
The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Fulton County South office and South Fulton Master Gardeners are offering area residents the opportunity to rent garden beds created as part of a youth-development grant in an effort to continue to contribute to the surrounding community.
A new seminar will help Georgia landowners navigate the complex world of solar energy options. CAES News
A new seminar will help Georgia landowners navigate the complex world of solar energy options.
*Postponed* UGA Extension to offer solar energy seminar for landowners
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is offering a new seminar, “Solar Energy in Rural Georgia: Opportunities for Landowners,” on Thursday, March 26 at the UGA-Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Georgia.
Steve Brown (left), executive director of the Peanut Research Foundation, and Jeff Johnson, a retired Birdsong Peanuts executive who serves on the Peanut Innovation Lab’s External Advisory Panel, discuss project proposals as the lab started a new five-year program in 2018. (Photo by Allison Floyd) CAES News
Steve Brown (left), executive director of the Peanut Research Foundation, and Jeff Johnson, a retired Birdsong Peanuts executive who serves on the Peanut Innovation Lab’s External Advisory Panel, discuss project proposals as the lab started a new five-year program in 2018. (Photo by Allison Floyd)
School snack could help students in Africa, create more demand for peanuts
Because peanut is nutritious, relatively inexpensive and shelf stable, the nut already is the main component in Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food to help children recover from severe malnutrition and in supplementary foods to prevent malnutrition. Numerous studies show cognitive benefits to people who consume nuts; research currently under way through the Peanut Innovation Lab could directly show that eating peanuts can help children succeed in school.
Since 2012, UGA soybean breeder Zenglu Li’s lab has developed 12 soybean cultivars designed for the Southeastern climate that have been released for agricultural use. CAES News
Since 2012, UGA soybean breeder Zenglu Li’s lab has developed 12 soybean cultivars designed for the Southeastern climate that have been released for agricultural use.
UGA professor, soybean breeder named to Georgia Seed Development Professorship
Zenglu Li, a professor in soybean breeding, genetics and genomics at the University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), has been named to the Georgia Seed Development Professorship in Soybean Breeding and Genetics.
Meat and seafood products are prepared for judges to sample during the first round UGA’s Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest. CAES News
Meat and seafood products are prepared for judges to sample during the first round UGA’s Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest.
Top food products chosen as University of Georgia’s 2020 Flavor of Georgia finalists
Judges have selected 30 products to compete in the second and final round of the University of Georgia’s annual Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest. Narrowed from a field of 117 products, the finalists will compete on April 7 in Athens with an awards ceremony following.
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia.
Some parts of Georgia have received more than 7 inches of rainfall recently, UGA expert says
Bright green grass across the fields, lawns and roadsides of northern and central Georgia is making those parts of the state look more like Ireland than a typical Georgia in February. Copious rain, coupled with periods of much warmer-than-normal temperatures, is waking up plants early and causing them to green up.
Student work harvesting herbs at UGArden. CAES News
Student work harvesting herbs at UGArden.
UGA experts give tips on growing medicinal herbs and plants
Although you may not have the kind of backyard garden that University of Georgia horticulture Professor Jim Affolter has, you might find many natural and traditional remedies hiding in plain sight in your ornamental garden.