Society’s Role in Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Agriculture exists to serve the citizens in an economic and educational capacity while providing the sustainable food and fiber resources for their well-being. Research from CAES delves into the role the general public plays in impacting agriculture and how the public uses this research by examining the following areas:

  • Agricultural and Environmental Learning
  • Economics
  • Agricultural/Rural Technology
  • Public Perception
  • Communicating AES
  • Personal Health
  • Sustainable Food Systems
  • Agricultural Policy
  • Community Leadership Development
  • Institutional Evaluation
  • Agricultural/Rural Social Structure

Society's Role in AES Research News

College of Veterinary Medicine faculty member Corrie Brown will administer a new U.S Department of Agriculture Foreign Agricultural Service grant that will allow UGA to host and train visiting veterinary and agricultural educators from Africa. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker) CAES News
UGA to host Faculty Exchange Program in African Veterinary Science
UGA’s interdisciplinary host team comprises the College of Veterinary Medicine, the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the Office of Global Engagement. The program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agricultural Service, is designed to help developing countries in Africa improve their university agricultural education, research and extension programs by providing one semester of training at U.S. land-grant agricultural universities.
Uttam Saha displays radon samples in the AESL's liquid scintillation counter, which measures radioactivity in water samples. CAES News
AESL provides testing, public education and mitigation to prevent radon-induced lung cancer
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s radon testing program — a holistic program that combines radon education outreach with research, testing and mitigation — has helped optimize sampling and testing methodology for radon in water throughout the U.S. The program has influenced national standards in radon testing.
Researchers in the US and Senegal are studying why young people leave peanut farming behind and move to the city, an important question for the future of farming in Senegal’s Groundnut Basin. University of Georgia PhD student Pierre Diatta and Virginia Tech’s Brad Mills (far left and left), will present early findings of the study, along with UGA agricultural economist Genti Kostandini (far right), in a webinar next week. The team is working with Katim Toure, a collaborator at ENSA (École Nationale Supérieure d'Agriculture) in Senegal. CAES News
Ag economists offer webinar on why young people leave the farm in Senegal
All over the world, farmers are aging and young people are moving to more urban areas for economic opportunities. Leaders wonder what factors push young people to abandon agriculture and whether technology or other tools can make farming a more attractive option for the next generation. Next week, researchers from the University of Georgia and Virginia Tech will present early findings from research exploring those questions in Senegal, where a team surveyed more than 1,000 peanut-growing households to explore challenges among peanut producers and learn the main reasons why young people turn away from agriculture.
Animal welfare is one of the top critical issues identified in a collaborative study for the ADS and ALEC departments