Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp presented the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year award to Crawford County farmer Robert Dickey during a reception held Tuesday, March 19, at the Georgia Freight Depot in Atlanta. Pictured left to right are Kemp, Dickey, Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black and UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue. CAES News
Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp presented the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year award to Crawford County farmer Robert Dickey during a reception held Tuesday, March 19, at the Georgia Freight Depot in Atlanta. Pictured left to right are Kemp, Dickey, Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black and UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue.
Robert Dickey named 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year
Crawford County peach farmer Robert Dickey has been named the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year. A fourth-generation farmer, Dickey manages approximately 1,000 acres of peaches and 3,000 acres of timberland with the help of his 90-year-old father, Bob Dickey, his wife, Cynde Dickey, and their son and daughter-in-law, Lee and Stacy Dickey.
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood CAES News
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood
Gardeners should use care and caution when tackling fire ants
Whether you have a well-manicured lawn or a wild preserve, almost every landscape in Georgia shares one feature: fire ants.
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia. CAES News
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia.
Winter rains to impact forage management
According to Lisa Baxter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s newest forage agronomist, an unusually wet winter will cause problems with summer forage crop quality in Georgia.
University of Georgia Professors Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, recently graduated from LEAD21, a leadership-development program designed for land-grant university professionals. Pictured left to right at the graduation ceremony in Alexandria, Virginia, are Susan Sumner, board chair of LEAD21, Joe Broder, coordinator of LEAD21 faculty activities at UGA, Laura Perry Johnson, UGA associate dean of Extension, Jackson, Pringle, Singh and Brian Kowalkowski, LEAD21 program chair. CAES News
University of Georgia Professors Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, recently graduated from LEAD21, a leadership-development program designed for land-grant university professionals. Pictured left to right at the graduation ceremony in Alexandria, Virginia, are Susan Sumner, board chair of LEAD21, Joe Broder, coordinator of LEAD21 faculty activities at UGA, Laura Perry Johnson, UGA associate dean of Extension, Jackson, Pringle, Singh and Brian Kowalkowski, LEAD21 program chair.
CAES faculty graduate from LEAD21 land-grant leadership program
Three University of Georgia professors were among the 79 individuals who completed the 14th class of the LEAD21 leadership-development program. Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, all faculty in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, represented UGA in the program, which is designed for land-grant institutions and their strategic partners from across the nation.
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season.
El Nino impacts Georgia agriculture
Farmers who might face a delayed planting season can thank El Niño for Georgia’s exceedingly wet winter, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. Row crop and vegetable producers usually begin planting their crops in late March through May, but excessive rainfall and cloudy conditions in January and February have left many fields soaked and soggy.
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Making Georgia and CAES No. 1 in Agriculture
As we celebrate National Agriculture Week 2019, many in the Southeast are still struggling to recover from hurricanes, tornadoes, whitefly outbreaks and record-breaking rainfall. Nature is both the nemesis and nurturer of agriculture - the ultimate “can’t live with it, can’t live without it” dilemma.
Pictured are Brian Hayes, Mitchell County Extension agent and county Extension coordinator; Monica Kilpatrick, state coordinator for Georgia Project WET; Debra Cox, Mitchell County 4-H Extension educator; Jennifer Grogan, retired Mitchell County 4-H agent and county Extension coordinator; and Calvin Perry, UGA C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park superintendent. CAES News
Pictured are Brian Hayes, Mitchell County Extension agent and county Extension coordinator; Monica Kilpatrick, state coordinator for Georgia Project WET; Debra Cox, Mitchell County 4-H Extension educator; Jennifer Grogan, retired Mitchell County 4-H agent and county Extension coordinator; and Calvin Perry, UGA C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park superintendent.
UGA Mitchell County Extension 4-H, C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park win award from Georgia Project WET
Along with the University of Georgia's C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park, the UGA Cooperative Extension 4-H program in Mitchell County has been named the 2019 Georgia Project WET Organization of the Year for hosting a Georgia 4-H camp designed to teach children the importance of water conservation.
Soil sample bags await processing at the University of Georgia Soil Testing Laboratory in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Soil sample bags await processing at the University of Georgia Soil Testing Laboratory in Athens, Ga.
Don't skip soil testing this spring
This spring, gardeners planning vegetable gardens — or even a major renovation of your ornamental beds — should take the opportunity to test their soil before they put plants in the ground.
Pictured are the symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight disease on brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale. Alternaria is a foliar pathogen, and symptoms first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings. CAES News
Pictured are the symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight disease on brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale. Alternaria is a foliar pathogen, and symptoms first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings.
Fungicide resistance spells trouble for Georgia, Virginia vegetable farmers
Popular vegetables like broccoli and kale are among the crops that could be in danger from Alternaria leaf blight — a disease that can cause spots on some brassica crops and render them unmarketable — which has developed resistance to a once-dependable fungicide Georgia farmers rely on, according to Bhabesh Dutta, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist.